Fellows

The Canadian Global Affairs Institute “Fellows” program consists of experts in Canadian defence, foreign affairs, and development policy from across Canada. Some are affiliated with academic institutions and some have extensive backgrounds in diplomatic, aid or military pursuits. They have agreed to affiliate themselves with the Canadian Global Affairs Institute to create a core of expertise that the Institute can draw upon for its research projects, its role as a responder to media contacts, and to fill the increasing demand for speakers on these topics. All of our Fellows regularly contribute to our quarterly newsletter. Please see below for an alphabetical list of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute Fellows and the key words they have chosen to describe their areas of expertise. For further information on communicating with the Canadian Global Affairs Institute Fellows, please contact:

Brittany Noppe
Events & Outreach Coordinator
Phone: (416) 700-8622
bnoppe@cgai.ca 

Current Research Fellows listing:

 

Howard Anglin

Ken Barker

John Barrett

David Bercuson

Kevin Birn

Jean-Christophe Boucher

Brett Boudreau

Brian Bow

Andrew Caddell

David Carment

Anthony Cary

Andrea Charron

Michael Cleland

Jeffrey F. Collins

Howard Coombs

Lindsay Coombs

Barry Cooper

Daryl Copeland

Jocelyn Coulon

D. Michael Day

Ferry de Kerckhove

Jim Donihee

Tim Dunne

Ross Fetterly

Matthew Fisher

Patricia Fortier

 

 

Julian Lindley-French

Frédérick Gagnon

Monica Gattinger

Sarah Goldfeder

Andrew Griffith

Marius Grinius

Robert Hage

David Higgins

Roger Hilton

Rolf Holmboe

Andrew House

Rob Huebert

Peter Jones

Thomas Juneau

Amy Karam

Tom Keenan

Brian Kingston

Adam Lajeunesse

Eugene Lang

Gavin Liddy

Matthew Lombardi

Dennis McConaghy

Randolph Mank

Barbara Martin

Kyle Matthews

Eric Miller

Robert Muggah

Michael Nesbitt

Kevin O’Shea

David Perry

Vanja Petricevic

George Petrolekas  

Joël Plouffe

Andrew P. Rasiulis

Tom Ring

Colin Robertson

Lindsay L. Rodman

Stephen Saideman

Hugh Segal

Elinor Sloan

Sarah Smith

Gary Soroka

Hugh Stephens

Al Stephenson

Kelly Sundberg

Denis Thompson

James Trottier

Heidi Tworek

Stéfanie von Hlatky

Charity Weeden

John Weekes


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Howard Anglin

Howard Anglin grew up in Victoria, British Columbia and attended McGill University where he read English Literature. He pursued graduate studies in literature before changing paths to attend New York University Law School, where he was an editor of the NYU Law Review, served as president of the NYU chapter of the Federalist Society, and was a research assistant for Prof. Alan Dershowitz.

After graduating in 2002, he practiced international securities law with two international law firms in New York and London, U.K., before accepting a clerkship with the Hon. Diarmuid O’Scannlainn on the United States Court of Appeal for the Ninth Circuit. After clerking, he resumed legal practice in Washington, D.C., with a focus on appellate litigation. In 2010-2011 he was a Washington Fellow at the National Review Institute.

In 2011, he moved to Ottawa to serve as Chief of Staff to The Hon. Jason Kenney, Minister of Citizenship, Immigration, and Multiculturalism. In 2013, he moved to the Prime Minister's Office where he first served as Senior Adviser, Legal Affairs and Policy, with responsibility for Justice, Immigration, Public Safety, and Democratic Reform policy. In 2014 he was appointed Deputy Chief of Staff to then-Prime Minister Stephen Harper. While in Ottawa, he was named by the Hill Times as one of the 25 “Most Powerful and Influential People in Government and Politics” in Canada for 2015 and by Embassy Magazine as one of the “Top 80 Influencing Canadian Foreign Policy” for 2013.

After leaving Ottawa, he consulted on immigration and integration in relation to the 2015-2016 migrant crisis for the Konrad Adenauer Stiftung in Berlin, Germany and became Executive Director of the Canadian Constitution Foundation in Calgary, where he oversees litigation in defence of constitutional rights and freedoms.

He has written on topics ranging from law and foreign policy to literature and art in publications including The Globe and Mail, The National Post, Policy Options, the Hill Times, the Toronto Sun, the Ottawa Citizen, the Montreal Gazette, Huffington Post, iPolitics, National Review Online, the Dorchester Review, the Salisbury Review, the American Conservative, and the N.Y.U. Law Review.

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Ken Barker

Ken Barker is a Professor of Computer Science at the University of Calgary. He holds a Ph.D. in Computing Science from the University of Alberta (1990); and has more than two decades of experience working with industrial computer systems and has consulting experience in the design of commercial databases. He has interest in system integration, distributed systems, and the privacy and security of data repositories. He has served as the Dean of the Faculty of Science and as Head of Computer Science at the University of Calgary. He is the President of the Canadian Information Processing Society (CIPS)-Alberta, was President of the Canadian Association of Computer Science (CACS/AIC), and has served on the Computer Science Accreditation Council. As the director of research laboratories at the Universities of Calgary and Manitoba he has supervised over 60 graduate students, in addition to several post-docs and research assistants. Dr. Barker has published over 200 peer reviewed publications.

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John Barrett

Dr. John Barrett is President and CEO of the Canadian Nuclear Association, a non-profit organization established in 1960 to represent the nuclear industry in Canada.

Dr. Barrett brings to the CNA a wide-ranging expertise in diplomatic negotiations, international security policy, strategic planning and strategic communications.  His career spans the federal public service, international organizations, policy think-tanks and universities, and nuclear industry – with a focus on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. 

As Canada’s Ambassador in Vienna, Dr. Barrett chaired the Board of Governor of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the UN Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice.  He also served as Canada’s Permanent Representative to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization. 

Dr. Barrett began his career in academia, earning a BA and MA from the University of Toronto and a doctorate from the London School of Economics.  He was appointed Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the Institute of International Relations at UBC before moving to Ottawa to join the Canadian Centre for Arms Control & Disarmament.

Throughout most of the 1990s, Dr. Barrett served in the NATO International Staff as Director of Policy Planning and Chief Speechwriter for successive NATO Secretaries-General.  Upon return to Canada, he continued high-level speechwriting and strategic communications for the Minister of National Defence (DND), the Governor General of Canada (Rideau Hall), and two Prime Ministers (Privy Council Office).

In 2005, Dr. Barrett re-joined Foreign Affairs from PCO, adding corporate planning and performance management to his portfolio.  As Director General of Strategic Planning, he developed the department’s Integrated Corporate Business Plan and served as Chief Risk Officer.  In 2006-2007, he chaired the UN Group of Government Experts on Verification, achieving a consensus report adopted by the UN General Assembly.  From 2009-2013 he was Canada’s bilateral Ambassador to Austria and to the Slovak Republic (2012-2013).  He was appointed President & CEO of the Canadian Nuclear Association in 2013.

Dr. Barrett is a Board Director of the World Institute of Nuclear Security (WINS) and holds the Institute for Corporate Directors IDD.D designation. 

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David Bercuson 

David Bercuson was born inMontreal in August 1945. He attended Sir George Williams University, graduating in June 1966 with Honours in History and winning the Lieutenant-Governor's Silver Medal for the highest standing in history. After graduation he pursued graduate studies at the University of Toronto, earning an MA in history in 1967 and a Ph.D. in 1971.

Dr. Bercuson has published in academic and popular publications on a wide range of topics specializing in modern Canadian politics, Canadian defence and foreign policy, and Canadian military history. He has written, coauthored, or edited over 30 popular and academic books and does regular commentary for television and radio. He has written for the Globe and Mail, the Toronto Star, the Calgary Herald, the National Post and other newspapers.

In 1988, Bercuson was elected to the Royal Society of Canada and in May 1989, he was appointed Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies at The University of Calgary. In 1997 he was appointed Special Advisor to the Minister of National Defence on the Future of the Canadian Forces. He was a member of the Minister of National Defence’s Monitoring Committee from 1997 to 2003. Since January 1997 he has been the Director of the Centre for Military and Strategic Studies at the University of Calgary. He is also the Director of Programs for the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, which is based in Calgary.

Dr. Bercuson’s newest book is The Fighting Canadians: Our Regimental History from New France to Afghanistan, published by HarperCollins.

Dr. Bercuson is Honorary Lieutenant Colonel of the 41 Combat Engineer Regiment, a Land Force Reserve military engineer unit of the Canadian Forces.

Dr. Becuson served on the Advisory Council on National Security and is a member of the Board of Governors, RMC.

In 2002 Dr. Bercuson was awarded the J. B. Tyrrell Historical Medal from the Royal Society of Canada. In 2003, he was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada.

He received the 2004 Vimy Award sponsored by the Conference of Defence Association Institute (CDAI) which recognizes Canadians who have made a significant and outstanding contribution to the defence and security of our nation and the preservation of our democratic values.

Keywords: Canadian defence policy, Canadian foreign policy, Canadian security policy, the Canadian forces, Canadian military history, Canada-US defence relations, Canada-NATO defence relations

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Kevin Birn

Kevin Birn, Executive Director, North American Crude Oil Markets, Energy, IHS Markit.  Mr. Birn is based in Calgary and leads western Canadian crude oil market research services which includes the Canadian Oil Sands Dialogue. Mr. Birn has authored over 40 reports on or associated with development of the Canadian oil sands. His expertise includes Canadian oil sands development, oil sands cost and competitiveness, crude oil markets, crude oil transportation logistics, greenhouse gas intensity of crude oil extraction, and Canadian energy and climate policy. Mr. Birn has contributed to numerous government and international collaborative research efforts including the 2011 National Petroleum Council report “Prudent Development of Natural Gas & Oil Resources” for the US Secretary of Energy. Prior to joining IHS Markit, Mr. Birn was a Senior Economist with the Government of Canada and a Partner in a software firm. Mr. Birn holds an undergraduate degree in business and a graduate degree in economics from the University of Alberta. His oil sands research is publicly available from IHS Markit at http://www.ihs.com/oilsandsdialogue.

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Jean-Christophe Boucher

Jean-Christophe Boucher is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Political Science, MacEwan University. His is currently a Research Fellow at the Centre for Foreign Policy Studies at Dalhousie University; Senior Fellow at the Centre interuniversitaire de recherché sur les relations internationales du Canada et du Québec; and book review editor for the Canadian Foreign Policy Journal. He holds a BA in History from the University of Ottawa, a MA in Philosophy from the Université de Montréal and a PhD in Political Science from Université Laval. He specializes in international relations, with an emphasis on peace and security issues, Canadian foreign and defence policies, and methodology. 

His current research interests focus on Canadian foreign and defence policy. First, his research looks into the domestic political ramifications of Canada’s mission in Afghanistan since 2001. Second, his interest concentrates on identifying and empirically measuring the influence of cultural variables in the formulation and implementation Canada’s international policy. Finally, his research project examines the relationship between media, public opinion, and Canadian foreign policy. His second research path concentrates on the causes of conflict management in international crises since the end of the Second World War. He is particularly interested in understanding, conceptualizing, and measuring non-events in international relations. 

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Brett Boudreau

Brett Boudreau served in the Canadian Armed Forces for nearly 28 years, including in the top military public affairs jobs in Canada as well as in NATO, retiring as a colonel. He is principal consultant at London, UK-based Veritas Strategic Communications, a firm that specializes in the integration of policy, operations and strategic narrative, particularly during times of crises. He is a graduate of the NATO Defence College senior course as well as earning a B.A. in Political Science, and an M.A. in Public Administration.  In addition to being a Fellow with the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, Brett is a senior analyst for Wikistrat and a Freeman of the UK Guild of Public Relations Practitioners.  In 2016, NATO published his first book, "We Have Met the Enemy And He Is Us", an examination of the strategic communications campaign during the NATO-led ISAF mission, 2003-2014.

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Brian Bow

Brian Bow is an Associate Professor of Political Science and the Director of the Centre for the Study of Security and Development (CSSD) at Dalhousie University, and Editor in Chief at International Journal. He holds a BA in International Relations from UBC, an MA in Political Science and Security Studies from York, and a PhD in Government from Cornell. He has published on Canadian foreign and defence policy, Canada-US relations, US foreign policy, and regional cooperation. His book, The Politics of Linkage: Power, Interdependence, and Ideas in Canada-US Relations (UBC Press) won the Donner Prize for 2009.

His main research project now is a long-term study of security policy coordination in North America, which looks at the political management of cross-border bureaucratic networks as mechanisms for policy innovation and cooperation. Other ongoing projects focus on the evolution of academic ideas about international relations and foreign policy in Canada, strategic framing and the contestation of legitimacy in regional integration, and the sources and limits of diplomatic leverage in Canada-US relations in the Trump era.

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Andrew Caddell

Andrew Caddell retired from Global Affairs Canada in July of 2017, concluding twenty years of service in the Government of Canada. He was most recently Senior Policy Advisor, North America Policy and Relations – Mexico with Global Affairs Canada. He was previously Director of Communications to the Premier of Newfoundland and Labrador; prior to that he worked in the Consular division of DGAC. He is currently Executive Director of the Scottish Society of Ottawa.

He joined the Department in 2001, working in roles of increasing responsibility in the Development, Trade, Policy, Africa and United Nations divisions and served abroad as Second Secretary in Delhi in 2009. He holds a Master's degree in Journalism and a B.A. in Political Science from Carleton University and is fluently bilingual in English and French.

He lived in Geneva, Switzerland from 1995 to 2000, and read the morning news for Radio 74, worked at the World Health Organization as Advocacy and Information Officer and served as a manager for UNICEF in Geneva, Dhaka (Bangladesh) and Skopje (Macedonia).  

In Canada, he was the Director of Communications for the Canadian Minister of Public Works and Government Services from 1994 to 1995 and from 1990 to 1994 was the Director of Public Affairs for the Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM) in Montreal.

His expertise in the media dates back to his work as a broadcast journalist in Ottawa, Montreal, Quebec City, St. John's, and Calgary from 1975 to 1981. He has lectured extensively on Canadian foreign policy and taught communications courses abroad. He has been published in the prestigious Canadian International Council “Behind the Headlines” series, in Policy Options magazine and on the op-ed pages of the Montreal Gazette, Globe and Mail and St. John’s Telegram.  In 2012, he published a book of articles and interviews with leaders in the UN system and donated it to Carleton University. In 2015, he published the first edition of “The Goal,” a collection of short stories on hockey. A revised version was published in 2017. 

In public life, he was a Town Councillor in Montreal West from 1989 to 1993 and has stood for office federally and provincially. Between 1980 and 1986 he was an advisor to ministers in the Government of Canada, Ontario and to the opposition leaders in Quebec and Newfoundland. He was an organizer for the “Non” campaign in the 1980 Quebec referendum.

Andrew Caddell has always been active in the community. He sponsors the “Pip” award for alumni of YMCA Kanawana in memory of his father and son. He is a member of the Conseil d'administration du Musée de Kamouraska; and on the board of the Atlantic Charter Foundation.

He has coached and managed minor hockey and soccer teams in Ottawa, climbed several mountains in the Canadian Rockies, cycled most of Canada, played semi-pro American football in Switzerland, ran the Ottawa Half-Marathon three times and plays hockey twice a week. He is married to Elaine Feldman and the father of three children, James (1973-2005), Emily and Jack.

 

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David Carment

David Carment is a Professor of International Affairs at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University, Ottawa. He served as Director of the Centre for Security and Defence Studies at Carleton University from 2002-2004. His recent books include, Peacekeeping Intelligence, Conflict Prevention: From Rhetoric to Reality, Using Force to Prevent Ethnic Violence: An Evaluation of Theory and Evidence and Conflict Prevention: Path to Peace or Grand Illusion? In addition Carment serves as the principal investigator for the Country Indicators for Foreign Policy project. His most recent work focuses on developing failed state risk assessment and early warning methodologies evaluating models of third party intervention.

In 2000-2001 Carment was a Fellow at Harvard University's Belfer Center. While there he contributed an article on peacekeeping for Harvard International Review and a co-authored a paper on "Bias and Intervention" for the BCSIA Working Paper Series.

Keywords: Ethnic conflict, communication technologies in conflict analysis & resolution, early warning, peacekeeping, conflict prevention, peace building & security issues in South and Southeast Asia, Eastern Europe & Africa

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Anthony Cary

Anthony Cary served as British Ambassador to Sweden (2003-6) and High Commissioner to Canada (2007-10). Previous diplomatic postings included Berlin, Kuala Lumpur and Washington DC. He served twice on secondment to the European Commission in Brussels, as deputy head of Leon Brittan's office there, and as head of Chris Patten’s. During a career break in the early 1980s he took an MBA at Stanford Business School on a Harkness Fellowship. 

He is currently a Commonwealth Scholarship Commissioner in the UK, and hon President of the Canada-UK Council. In 2015 he was – for the third time – a Cundill History Prize juror.

He married Clare Elworthy in 1975. They have three sons and a daughter.

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Andrea Charron

Dr. Andrea Charron holds a PhD from the Royal Military College of Canada (Department of War Studies). She obtained a Masters in International Relations from Webster University, Leiden, The Netherlands, a Master’s of Public Administration from Dalhousie University and a Bachelor of Science (Honours) from Queen’s University. Her research and teaching areas include NORAD, the Arctic, foreign and defence policy and sanctions. She serves on the DND’s Defence Advisory Board and has published in numerous peer-reviewed journals.

 Dr. Charron worked for various federal departments including the Privy Council Office in the Security and Intelligence Secretariat and Canada’s Revenue Agency. She is now Director of the University of Manitoba’s Centre for Defence and Security Studies and Assistant Professor in Political Studies. 

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Michael Cleland

Mr. Cleland is a private consultant with extensive experience in energy and environment policy. He is at present Senior Fellow with the University of Ottawa’s Positive Energy Project, Chair of the Board of Directors at the Canadian Energy Research Institute, a member of the Board of Directors of QUEST (Quality Urban Energy Systems of Tomorrow) and a Fellow with the Canadian Global Affairs Institute.

He is formerly President and CEO of the Canadian Gas Association. Prior to joining CGA, he was Senior Vice President Government Affairs for the Canadian Electricity Association (CEA). Before joining CEA, he was Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM), Energy Sector in the Department of Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), formerly Energy, Mines and Resources (EMR) and before that, Director General of the Energy Policy Branch. From 1987 to January 1990, he was Assistant Director, Resource Policy Division in the Department of Finance.

Before joining the federal government in 1987, Mr. Cleland worked in Nova Scotia where, he was a lecturer in business/government relations at the school of Public Administration at Dalhousie University and academic editor of Plan Canada, the journal of the Canadian Institute of Planners. From 1982 to 1985, he was Associate Director of the Centre for Development Projects at Dalhousie University where he was responsible for various management training projects in Zimbabwe and the countries of the Commonwealth Caribbean. Prior to joining Dalhousie University, he occupied a number of positions at the Nova Scotia Departments of Development and Municipal Affairs. Mr. Cleland was born in Quesnel, British Columbia, and educated at the University of British Columbia (BA in political science 1972) and Queens (MPL urban and regional planning 1974).

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Jeffrey F. Collins

Jeffrey F. Collins earned a PhD in political science from Carleton University in 2018. 

He also holds a MA in strategic studies (Birmingham), a law degree (Aberdeen), and a BA and certificate in public administration (Memorial). He is an experienced policy advisor at both the federal and provincial level and is currently a research fellow with both the University of Manitoba's Centre for Defence and Security Studies and Dalhousie University's Centre for the Study of Security and Development, respectively.

Jeff's research interests are in defence procurement, missile defence, Canadian and Australian defence policy and the Arctic. He has spoken and published widely in these areas and is the co-editor of the book, "Reassessing the Revolution in Military Affairs" (Palgrave Macmillan 2015). A new book, "Canada's Defence Procurement Woes" (Palgrave Macmillan), is due out in 2019.

A proud east coaster, Jeff hails from Newfoundland but now resides in Prince Edward Island.

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Howard Coombs

DR. Howard G. Coombs retired from full-time duty with the Canadian Armed Forces in 2003 and transferred to the Canadian Army Reserve, where he continues to serve on a part-time basis. He is currently assigned to the staff of the Canadian Army Doctrine and Training Centre Headquarters, Kingston as Chief of Staff (Reserve) in the rank of Colonel.  From 1976-1979 Coombs was member of 2415 Gonzaga Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps, St. John’s, Newfoundland. Since enrolling in the CAF in 1979, Coombs has had the privilege of command from platoon to brigade, as well as held a variety of staff positions. His current regimental affiliation is the PWOR. He is a graduate of the Canadian Forces Staff School, Canadian Land Force Command and Staff College, United States Army Command and General Staff College, and the US Army School of Advanced Military Studies, which awarded his Master's degree. Coombs received his PhD in military history from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario and is currently an Assistant Professor of the Royal Military College of Canada.

Coombs has a number of operational deployments to the former Yugoslavia and Afghanistan as a military officer on regular and reserve duty. In addition, he deployed with Joint Task Force Afghanistan from September 2010 to July 2011 as a civilian advisor to the Task Force Commander. He has been awarded both the Canadian Forces Medallion for Distinguished Service and the Order of Military Merit. His current research interests focus on Canadian military history since 1945 and Canada’s involvement in contemporary conflict.

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Lindsay Coombs -- 2018 WiDS/CGAI Fellowship Recipient 

Lindsay Coombs is a PhD student in the Department of Political Studies at Queen’s University and a Graduate Research Fellow at the Centre for International and Defence Policy. Lindsay completed a Master of Arts in Political Studies, also from Queen’s University, where she specialized in International Relations. Her Master’s thesis focused on innovation in Canadian military doctrine, training, and education on the topic of child soldiers. Lindsay also holds a Bachelor with Honours in Conflict Studies and Human Rights from the University of Ottawa, where she graduated with distinction. Her research interests include the Canadian Armed Forces, child soldiers, women in security and defence, and defence policy. In addition to her studies, Lindsay is the National Chapter Coordinator for Women in International Security (WIIS) Canada, a network dedicated to actively advancing women’s leadership in international peace and security. In this role, she coordinates the activities of university and community Chapters across the nation. Lindsay is also the President and Founder of WIIS at Queen’s University.

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Barry Cooper

Barry Cooper, a fourth generation Albertan, was educated at Shawnigan Lake School, the University of British Columbia and Duke University (PhD, 1969). He taught at Bishop's University, McGill, and York University before coming to the University of Calgary in 1981. He has been a visiting professor in Germany and the United States. His teaching and research has tried to bring the insights of Western political philosophers to bear on contemporary issues, from the place of technology and the media in Canada, to the debate over the constitutional status of Quebec and Alberta, to current military and security policy. Cooper has published 30 books and over 150 articles and papers that reflect the dual focus of his work; most recently (with Lydia Miljan) he wrote Hidden Agendas: How Canadian Journalists Influence the News published by UBC Press (2003). In the spring of 2004, New Political Religions: An Analysis of Modern Terrorism was published by the University of Missouri Press. In 2009 he edited Tilo Schabert’s  How World Politics is Made: France and the Reunification of Germany.  He publishes a regular column in the Calgary Herald and other CanWest Global papers. 

Cooper has lectured extensively in Europe, the United States, India, Australia and China. He has received numerous on-going research grants from public and private Canadian, French, German, and American granting agencies. In addition he has received two major awards, the Konrad Adenauer Award from the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung, and a Killam Research Fellowship.

He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and of the Centre for Military and Strategic Studies at the University of Calgary.

Keywords: Terrorism, Canadian defence and security policy, Canada-US relations

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Daryl Copeland

Daryl Copeland, Senior Fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, is an analyst, author, educator and consultant specializing in the relationship between science, technology, diplomacy, and international policy. His book, Guerrilla Diplomacy: Rethinking International Relations, was released in 2009 by Lynne Rienner Publishers and is cited as an essential reference by the editors of Oxford Bibliographies Online. A frequent public speaker, Mr. Copeland comments regularly for the national media on global issues and public management, and has written over 100 articles for the scholarly and popular press. His work has appeared in many anthologies, as well as in the International Journal, World Politics Review, Foreign Policy in Focus, The Hague Journal of Diplomacy, Place Branding and Public Diplomacy, The Globe and Mail, Toronto Star, Ottawa Citizen, Embassy, The MarkiPolitics and elsewhere. He was awarded the 2010 Molot Prize for best article published in Canadian Foreign Policy (“Virtuality, Diplomacy and the Foreign Ministry”, 15:2).

From 1981 to 2011 Mr. Copeland served as a Canadian diplomat with postings in Thailand, Ethiopia, New Zealand and Malaysia. During the 1980s and 1990s, he was elected a record five times to the Executive Committee of the Professional Association of Foreign Service Officers. From 1996-99 he was National Program Director of the Canadian Institute of International Affairs in Toronto and Editor of Behind the Headlines, Canada’s international affairs magazine. In 2000, he received the Canadian Foreign Service Officer Award for his “tireless dedication and unyielding commitment to advancing the interests of the diplomatic profession.” 

Among his positions at the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) in Ottawa, Mr. Copeland has worked as Senior Intelligence Analyst, South and Southeast Asia; Deputy Director for International Communications; Director for Southeast Asia; Senior Advisor, Public Diplomacy; Director of Strategic Communications Services; and, Senior Advisor, Strategic Policy and Planning. He was DFAIT representative to the Association of Professional Executives (APEX) 2001-06. 

Mr. Copeland is a Visiting Professor at the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna, and has delivered courses at the University of Ottawa’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, the London Academy of Diplomacy (UK), Otago University (NZ) and the Institute of Diplomacy and Foreign Relations (Malaysia). He serves as a peer reviewer for University of Toronto Press, the International Journal and The Hague Journal of Diplomacy, and is a member of the Editorial Board of the journal Place Branding and Public Diplomacy and the International Advisory Board of the Canadian Foreign Policy Journal. From 2009-11 he was Adjunct Professor and Senior Fellow at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs. In 2009 he was a Research Fellow at the University of Southern California’s Center on Public Diplomacy. He is a Policy Fellow at the University of Montreal's Centre for International Studies (CERIUM).

Mr. Copeland grew up in downtown Toronto, and received his formal education at the University of Western Ontario (Gold Medal, Political Science; Chancellor’s Prize, Social Sciences) and the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (Canada Council Special MA Scholarship). He has spent years backpacking on six continents, and enjoys travel, photography, arts and the outdoors. 

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Jocelyn Coulon

Jocelyn Coulon, Research Fellow at the Montreal Centre for International Studies, is an analyst, author and researcher, specializing in peace operations and international policy. In 2016-2017, he was Senior policy advisor to Canada’s Minister of Foreign Affairs, Stéphane Dion. Previously was on the advisory council of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute (then the Canadian Defence & Foreign Affairs Institute) for 10 years, and is also a member of the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS).

In the past few years, he has published a number of books, including, in 1998, Soldiers of Diplomacy: The United Nations, Peacekeeping, and The New World Order, University of Toronto Press, and in 2004, L'agression: Les États-Unis, l'Irak et le monde, both published by Athéna Éditions.

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D. Michael Day 

LGen (retd) Mike Day CMM, MSC, CD, was born in Windsor Nova Scotia and grew up in Ontario, Quebec and Birkenhead England prior to joining the Canadian Forces in 1983. Initially trained as an Infantry Officer he joined his Regiment, the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry and he has commanded at every level and rank, in a variety of units, and deployments around the world. 

In addition to having the privilege of serving and commanding within his Regiment, the majority of his field and command time has been as an Operator within Canada’s Counter Terrorist and Special Forces community commanding both Joint Task Force Two ( JTF 2), Canada’s Special Operations Forces Command as well as a variety of other command assignments. 

With the majority of his time spent in Command he has also served in a variety of Senior Staff appointments including employment as the Canadian Armed Forces senior Military Officer in the Defence Policy Group, and the Chief Strategic Planner for the future of the Canadian Armed Forces.

LGen Day has deployed operationally to Africa, the Balkans (3 times), the Middle East, and Afghanistan (twice). Additionally he has lived in Naples Italy where he was responsible for the preparation, training and oversight of NATO’s Response Force.

He has a degree in Political Studies (with distinction) from the University of Manitoba and a Masters of Arts in War Studies, from the Royal Military College of Canada, where he focussed on International Relations and Special Operations.

LGen Day Runs an Investment and Consulting Business, is a member of the Advisory Board to the Bragg Family Companies, a Fellow of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute and active in a number of Veteran Support initiatives.

LGen Day is married and has two sons both currently serving in the Canadian Military.  He retired in September 2015 and is currently waiting for the inevitable call from the PGA to play on tour. 

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Ferry de Kerckhove

Ferry de Kerckhove was born in Belgium in 1947.   He has a B.Soc. Sc. Honours in Economics, an M.A. in Political Science from the University of Ottawa and pursued Ph.D. Studies at Laval University in Québec City. 

He joined the Canadian Foreign Service in September 1973. From 1981 to 1985, he was Economic Counsellor at the Canadian Delegation to NATO. In September 1992, he was posted to Moscow as Minister and Deputy Head of Mission. In 1995 he became Associate Chief Air Negotiator, then Deputy Head of the Policy Branch and Director-General, Federal-Provincial Relations in Foreign Affairs and International Trade.  He was named High Commissioner to the Islamic Republic of Pakistan in August 1998. In September 2001, he became Ambassador to the Republic of Indonesia. He was also accredited to Timor Leste.

In September 2003 he joined the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Ottawa as a Canadian Center for Management Development Diplomat in Residence. In 2004 he became Director General, International Organizations. In July 2006, he added to his responsibilities the function of Personal representative of the Prime Minister for Francophonie. In 2008 he was named ambassador to the Arab Republic of Egypt.

He retired from the Foreign Service on September 23d, 2011. He is a Senior Fellow at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Ottawa, a Fellow of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, and a Member of the Board of the Conference of Defence Associations Institute.  He is the author of the CDA Institute’s Strategic Outlook for Canada 2016. He is a former board member of WIND Mobile Canada. He is President of Ferry de Kerckhove International Consultants Inc.

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Jim Donihee

A passion for flight led Mr. Donihee to become a single seat fighter pilot (CF104, CF5, & CF18 Hornet) in Canada’s Air Force where he served for twenty-eight years before retiring as an Air Force Colonel.  Colonel Donihee has extensive multinational operational experience having served in NATO operations, as a NATO Battle Commander of forces in Yugoslavia, NORAD Commander in the Arctic and US, and as Wing Commander of CFB Cold Lake, Canada’s largest operational CF-18 fighter base.  For noteworthy excellence in leadership throughout his career, Colonel Donihee was decorated by the Governor General of Canada and inducted into the Order of Military Merit. 

Upon retirement from the RCAF in 2000, Colonel Donihee transitioned to industry in Calgary where he has held a number of executive positions including: VP & Chief of Staff at Pengrowth; Chief Operating Officer at the National Energy Board; VP Organizational Effectiveness at EnCana; and most recently Chief Operating Officer for the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association.  A strategic thinker and skilled Governance practitioner, Mr. Donihee is ICD trained and has extensive Board experience having served as a founding Board Member of Projex Technologies; Chair of the Corps of Commissionaires of Southern Alberta; the Board of Directors of Enform, Canada’s upstream oil & gas association dedicated to improving safety performance; and also currently serves on the Board of Directors for Legal Aid Alberta.  Colonel Donihee is a recognized change leader possessing extensive expertise in operational leadership, defence policy, energy policy and regulatory structures.

Colonel Donihee holds a Bachelors of Business Administration from the College Militaire Royal.  He has also completed the Queen’s University executive program on Strategic Planning as well as Masters level studies in Systems Integration and Project Management, and the Australian Army’s Command and Staff College focusing on Strategic and Operational Leadership. 

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Tim Dunne

Major Tim Dunne is a retired military public affairs officer of the Canadian Armed Forces. He has served for 32 years in the regular (full time) force and five years in the reserve (part time) force. He has served on both Canada’s coasts and at National Defence Headquarters. His deployments include the United Nations peacekeeping forces in Egypt, Israel, Croatia, and Bosnia Herzegovina, with NATO peace implementation forces in Kosovo, Macedonia and Albania and with NATO's preventive deployment of Patriot missiles to southern Turkey at the beginning of the Iraq war in 2002.

While the Chief of Media Operations at the southern Europe headquarters for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in Naples, Italy (2000 to 2004), he conducted public affairs seminars for public sector personnel in the Middle East, northern Africa, and eastern and western Europe, and was the director of communications at NATO press information centres for the Cooperative Key series of air exercises in Romania, Bulgaria and France.

Examples of his project work include the establishment and co-administration of the Swissair 111 international media centre in 1998, the arrival of 2,400 ethnic Albanian Kosovar refugees to Nova Scotia in 1999, the founding of the DND public affairs instructional center in Ottawa, and establishing a public-sector communications instructional centre in Skopje, Macedonia for the six Balkan nations.

His awards include The National Award of Excellence from the Canadian Public Relations Society (1988), citation from the Privy Council of Canada (1991), the International Association of Business Communicators Silver Leaf and Gold Quill awards (1998), and the Bulgarian Order of Loyal Service (2001).

He was appointed the Military Affairs Advisor for the Province of Nova Scotia in 2007, a first in Canada and retired from the Nova Scotia Public Service in 2009. Currently, he is a part time professor of communication studies at Mount Saint Vincent University, the military affairs commentator and columnist for the Chronicle Herald, and the Atlantic Canada correspondent for the FrontLine family of publications.

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Ross Fetterly

Ross Fetterly retired in 2017 from the Canadian Forces after a 34-year career as the Royal Canadian Air Force’s director of air comptrollership and business management.  He previously served as the military personnel command comptroller, and in other senior positions with the Department of National Defence Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance).

Retired Col. Fetterly completed a tour in February 2009 as the chief CJ8 at the NATO base headquarters at Kandahar airfield, Afghanistan, where he was responsible for finance, contracting and procurement. While deployed he wrote a paper entitled Methodology for Estimating the Fiscal Impact of the Costs Incurred by the Government of Canada in Support of the Mission in Afghanistan with staff from the Parliamentary Budget Office.  Col. Fetterly was employed as the deputy commanding officer of the Canadian contingent in the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force in the Golan Heights during the second intifada in 2000-2001.  He has served as an air force squadron logistics officer and as a finance officer at military bases across Canada. 

An adjunct professor at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC) department of management and economics, and a Senior Fellow with the Centre for Security Governance, Dr. Fetterly has a B.Comm (McGill), M.Admin (University of Regina) and an MA and PhD in war studies from RMC.  His PhD fields of study included defence economics, defence policy and defence cost analysis.  His primary research focus is defence resource management. Dr. Fetterly also teaches courses in financial decision-making, defence resource management and government procurement at RMC.  Through his company, Ross Fetterly Consulting Inc., he teaches a defence resource management course and a business planning course internationally for the Department of National Defence to senior military officers and defence executives in developing countries.

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Matthew Fisher

Matthew Fisher was born in northwestern Ontario and raised there and in the Ottawa Valley. He has lived and worked abroad for 34 years as a foreign correspondent for the Globe and Mail, Sun Media and Postmedia, and is a Fellow with the Canadian Global Affairs Institute. His assignments have taken him to 162 countries. He has been an eyewitness to 19 conflicts including Somalia, the Rwandan genocide, Chechnya, the Balkan Wars, Israel in Gaza and Lebanon, the two Gulf Wars and Afghanistan.

@mfisheroverseas

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Patricia Fortier

Patricia A Fortier is a retired Canadian diplomat whose career focused on political relations, governance, international security, consular/crisis management, and trade/ investment.  She is currently on the board of a public Canadian mining company (Primero), is a Fellow of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, Senior Fellow of the Graduate School of International Affairs at the University of Ottawa and on the board of the Canadian Retired Heads of Mission Association.

She acted most recently (2016) as Assistant Deputy Minister responsible for Security, Consular, and Emergency Management in Global Affairs Canada. Other assignments in Ottawa included Director General, Consular Operations (2009-11) and Director, Peacekeeping and Regional Security (1995-2000) when she was also ex-officio director on the board of the Pearson Peacekeeping Centre.

She was Canadian Ambassador to Peru and Bolivia (2011-5) and Ambassador to the Dominican Republic (2006-9) as well as Minister-Counsellor (Political) at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, D.C. (2001-5). Her work abroad also included Senior Advisor to the OAS Electoral Observation Mission to Peru (2006) and Chief Advisor to the High Level Mission to Peru (2000-1). In Costa Rica, she worked with international NGOs on climate change (Earth Council 1994-5) and human rights/democracy (Instituto Interamericano de los Derechos Humanos 1992-4). Other postings included Chile (2000), Canadian mission to the United Nations in New York (to support Canada’s seat on the Security Council 1989-90), India ( Immigration 1987-89), Kenya and Zambia (Development) 1984-87).

Before entering the Canadian Foreign Service, she was Director of Policy Planning for City of Edmonton Transit (1981-3) where she helped plan the city’s first Light Rail Transit system.

She has a Master's in Public Administration and a BA (Hons) from Queen's University in Kingston (1979) and was a Weatherhead Fellow at Harvard University in Cambridge Massachusetts (2005-6). In 2016, she attended the first “Women as Directors” course at the Harvard Business School. She speaks English (mother tongue), Spanish and French. She is married to former Canadian diplomat Paul Durand.

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Julian Lindley-French

Educated at Oxford, UEA and in Florence, Professor Dr Julian Lindley-French is a leading adviser, strategist, and author with ten published books to his name and many articles who has also held three professorial chairs.

Until 2017 Vice-President of the Atlantic Treaty Association in Brussels, he is a Distinguished Visiting Research Fellow at the National Defense University in Washington; Senior Fellow, at the Institute for Statecraft in London; Director of Europa Analytica in the Netherlands; and a Fellow of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, as well as a Visiting Programme Director at Wilton Park. In 2015 he was made an Honorary Member of the Association of Anciens of the NATO Defence College in Rome. He served for some years as a member of the Chief of Defence Staff’s Strategic Advisory Group and as Head of the Commander’s Initiative Group (CIG) for the Allied Rapid Reaction Corps.

In November 2017 he co-published the The Future Tasks of the Adapted Alliance (The GLOBSEC NATO Adaptation Reports), for which he was Lead Writer, with (inter alia) General John R. Allen, Admiral Giampaolo di Paola and Ambassador Sandy Vershbow. This major senior leader project considers NATO Adaptation and the future role on the Alliance in the changing strategic environment.  The final report can be downloaded at https://www.globsec.org/news/globsec-nato-adaptation-initiative-final-report/

In early 2018 he was made a member of the high-level US-German Loisach Group set up by the George Marshall Center and the Munich Security Conference. He is currently working on a major book project entitled The Defence of Europe with General (Ret.d) John Allen and Lieut. General (Ret.d) Frederick (Ben) Hodges.

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Frédérick Gagnon

Frédérick Gagnon is Director of the Center for United States Studies of the Raoul Dandurand Chair in Strategic and Diplomatic Studies, and Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Québec at Montreal where he teaches U.S. Politics, Government and Foreign Policy.  He was a Fulbright grantee at University of Massachusetts in Amherst (2005), Visiting Scholar at the Canada Institute of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and at the Center for American Politics and Citizenship of the University of Maryland (2006), and Visiting Scholar/Professor at the Center for Canadian-American Studies of Western Washington University (2008).  A second Fulbright grant allowed him to hold the Distinguished Chair in Québec Studies at the State University of New York - Plattsburgh (Fall 2014), and to be a Fulbright Scholar at the University of California - Berkeley (Spring 2015).

He is the author of one of the rare French language texbooks on the U.S. Congress (published at Presses de l’Université du Québec, 2006) and his latest publications include journal articles on U.S. congressional elections (in Politique américaine, Winter 2010-2011), U.S. Congress and foreign policy (in Foreign Policy Analysis, 2016), U.S. culture wars (in Canadian Review of American Studies, December 2010), Québec-U.S. relations (in Québec Studies, 2016), and on the representation of militarism in U.S. digital games and pop culture (in European Journal of American Studies, 2010), as well as book chapters on U.S. war on terrorism (published at CQ Press, 2013), U.S. neoconservatism (published at Athéna, 2010), and antiamericanism in Québec (published at Presses de l’Université Laval, 2010).  One of his latest books, published in 2013, studies the influence of the chairman of the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee after 1945.

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Monica Gattinger

Monica Gattinger is Director of the University of Ottawa’s Institute for Science, Society and Policy and Associate Professor at uOttawa’s School of Political Studies. Her research and engagement focus on strengthening public policy and regulation in the context of fast-paced innovation and markets, fundamental social and value change, and lower levels of public trust in government, industry, science and expertise. She has spearheaded major projects and written widely on these topics as they relate to North American energy policy and Canadian arts and cultural policy.

Monica is a member of the International Advisory Board for the Washington-based think tank the Center for Policy on Emerging Technologies, a Fellow of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, a member of Pollution Probe’s Energy Exchange and Energy Ambassadors Advisory Councils, and a member of the Editorial Boards of the University of Ottawa Press and the journal Canadian Public Administration.

In 2016, Dr. Gattinger received a Departmental Achievement Award from Natural Resources Canada for Outstanding Leadership on public confidence in energy and mining development. Her expertise is regularly sought out by companies, industry associations, parliamentary committees, NGOs, government ministries and regulatory agencies at the municipal, provincial, national and international levels.

She holds a Ph.D. in public policy from Carleton University. 

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Sarah Goldfeder

Sarah Goldfeder is a Principal at the Earnscliffe Strategy Group in Ottawa, where she provides high-level insight on the inner workings of the U.S. and Canadian governments, including how they work together on important issues. With 15 years of experience in the U.S. federal government, Sarah most recently served as Special Assistant to two U.S. Ambassadors to Canada, fostering bilateral relationships at the most senior levels. Her understanding of the interplay between state and federal governments complements her service within the U.S. federal bureaucracy. She has expertise in a wide range of policy issues, which has enabled her to provide practical short and long-term advice on managing the economic, cultural and political dynamics in North America.

Prior to her arrival in Ottawa, Sarah spent three years in Mexico as a Foreign Service Officer, cultivating a deep understanding of U.S./Mexico border issues and appreciation for a region revitalizing itself after years of violence and fear. Her experiences have convinced her of the potential for a stronger, more cohesive partnership across the North American continent. In her work, she seeks to maximize the region's ability to advance the movement of people, goods, and services; the supply, production, and use of energy; and balancing the energy and environment equation. Sarah has also served in Southeast Asia, giving her a global perspective on North American policy development and an appreciation of the opportunities available both within and beyond the Western hemisphere.

Sarah is a North American nomad, with a father from Brooklyn, a mother from Chicago, and a life lived in eight states, six countries, and three continents. She calls the West her home, having studied at the University of Oregon in Eugene, Oregon and Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado.

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Andrew Griffith

Andrew is the author of  Multiculturalism in Canada: Evidence and Anecdote, providing an integrated view of how well multiculturalism is working, Policy Arrogance or Innocent Bias: Resetting Citizenship and Multiculturalism, describing the relationship between the bureaucratic and political levels, and “Because it’s 2015 …” Implementing Diversity and Inclusion, analyzing the diversity of the 2015 election and political appointments. He regularly comments on citizenship, multiculturalism and diversity issues, in his blog, Multiculturalism Meanderings, as well in the media.

Andrew was formerly Director General, Citizenship and Multiculturalism Branch, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada. Andrew led policy and program development to strengthen citizenship, inclusion and participation, and inter-cultural understanding.

Previous assignments include Service Canada, where he lead planning, reporting and evaluation related to citizen-centred service transformation, organizational change and priority setting and developed service strategies and offerings to orient service around the needs of Canadians; Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, where he led a government-wide review of Canada's representation abroad and the negotiation and implementation of an interdepartmental agreement and service standards on the common services and infrastructure at Canadian offices abroad; Industry Canada, where he was responsible for coordinating trade development priorities, providing support and direction to International Trade Centres across Canada, and Industry Canada’s participation in Team Canada Inc; and Privy Council Office, where Andrew was a senior analyst responsible for industry and trade files.

Other positions held in Ottawa include Executive Assistant to the Deputy Minister of Trade and a member of the Policy Planning Staff of Global Affairs Canada.

In addition to being posted to the Canadian Mission to the World Trade Organization, Geneva, where he was the lead negotiator for trade and environment, and standards issues, Andrew has held trade assignments in Los Angeles, Iran, Saudi Arabia and Argentina.

His government publications include From a Trading Nation to a Nation of Traders: Toward a Second Century of Canadian Trade Development and Market Access and Environmental Protection: A Negotiator’s Point of View. He has received a number of awards for his government service, including the Public Service Award (2007, 2010), and the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal (2012).

Andrew has also written Living with Cancer: A Journey, recounting his recent experience with cancer, in addition to contributing to MD Anderson’s Cancerwise.

Andrew is a fellow of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute.

Andrew lives in Ottawa and is married with two adult children.

Email: agriffith232@gmail.com
LinkedIn: Andrew L Griffith
Twitter: @Andrew_Griffith
Blog: Multicultural Meanderings
Facebook: Andrew Griffith C&M

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Marius Grinius

Marius Grinius joined the Canadian Foreign Service in 1979 after serving in the Canadian Army for 12 years. His early overseas postings included Bangkok, NATO/Brussels and Hanoi. Assignments back in Ottawa included desk officer for nuclear arms control, Director for Asia Pacific South and then Director for South East Asia. In 1997 he was posted back to Vietnam as Ambassador. 

Marius spent 1999 to 2004 in Ottawa where he worked in the Privy Council Office in Social Policy, Western Economic Diversification and then again in the Privy Council Office as Director of Operations in the Security and Intelligence Secretariat. In 2004 he was named Ambassador to South Korea and added cross-accreditation to North Korea in 2005. In 2007 Marius was posted to Geneva as Ambassador and Permanent Representative to the United Nations and the Conference on Disarmament. He returned to Ottawa in 2011 for a secondment to the Department of National Defence as Director General International Security Policy. Marius retired in 2012 after 45 years of service to Canada.

While trying to maintain his “gentleman of leisure” status, Marius has given presentations at various conferences and seminars related to international security, Canadian foreign and defence policy, and Canada’s place in Asia.

He is a graduate of the Royal Military College, Class of 1971.

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Robert Hage

Robert Hage was a Canadian diplomat with the Department of Global Affairs for 38 years and served as Canada’s Ambassador to Hungary and Slovenia, as Director General for Europe and Director General for Legal Affairs. He also served in Canada’s embassies in Washington, Lagos and Paris, as Deputy Head of the Canadian Mission to the European Union in Brussels and, in early 2012, acting Head of Mission at the Canadian Embassy in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. 

He was also Director of four divisions including International Financial and Investment Affairs and relations with the European Union; Principal Counsel for the Canada-USA Free Trade Agreement; Counsel on the Environmental Side Agreement to NAFTA and a representative for Canada at the United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea.   He has written and commented on a range of subjects including West Coast energy issues, maritime boundaries and Canada-EU relations.  Mr. Hage teaches a course on Modern Diplomacy at the University of Ottawa’s graduate school.

Mr. Hage was born in Calgary, Alberta and received his early education there.  He is a graduate of the University of Calgary and obtained law degrees from the University of Toronto (LL.B) and University College London (LL.M) and is called to the Alberta Bar.  He also attended the École Nationale d’Administration (ENA) in Paris.  He is married and has three daughters.

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David Higgins

A native of Toronto, David served in the Canadian Forces Reserve before enrolling in the Regular Force in 1980. An Air Combat Systems Officer, he served as a tactical and long-range navigator and mission specialist on various Canadian Forces and allied nation aircraft. He was also employed in a variety of aircrew training capacities, including Tanker-Transport-Bomber Instructor and Chief of Standardization and Evaluation (United States Air Force Air Education and Training Command) and Advanced Flight Commander (Canadian Forces Aerospace and Navigation School).

His senior appointments have included Commander 9 Wing/CFB Gander; Director of Continental and Western Hemisphere Policy, National Defence Headquarters; Vice Director of Plans, North American Aerospace Defence Command (NORAD) and Commander 8 Wing/Canadian Forces Base Trenton. He also served as Policy Advisor to the Canada-United States Permanent Joint Board on Defence, Policy Member of the Canada-United States Military Cooperation Committee, a Command Director of the NORAD-United States Space Command Operations Centre and Air Mobility Advisor to the Commander 1 Canadian Air Division. His final military appointment was as Director Arms Control Verification in the Strategic Joint Staff, responsible for the planning, coordination and implementation of Canada’s proliferation security and confidence- and security-building programme, as prescribed by the treaties, agreements and arrangements established within the framework of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons and the United Nations, including the Conference on Disarmament.

David is a graduate of the Canadian Forces Command and Staff Course and National Security Studies Course. He holds a Doctorate in War Studies from King’s College London, Masters degrees in Defence Studies (Royal Military College of Canada) and Diplomacy (Norwich University) and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Toronto.

Keywords: Canadian defence and security policy; Canada-United States defence relations; ballistic missile defence; proliferation security; arms control; confidence- and security-building; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR); air mobility; NORAD; NATO; OSCE.

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Roger Hilton

Roger Hilton is a Non-Resident Academic Fellow at the Institute for Security Policy at Kiel University and Deputy Secretary-General of the Youth Atlantic Treaty Association (YATA). He is a 2016 graduate of the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna and holds a Masters Degree in Advanced International Studies, as well as a 2013 foreign policy certificate from the Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO). Roger has previous experience with the delegation of the Kingdom of Belgium at the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE).  In addition, he has worked at the Office of the State Minister of Georgia for European and Euro-Atlantic Integration in Tbilisi, as well as the Estonian Atlantic Treaty Association in Tallinn. He was a member of the 2016 Riga Conference Future Leader Forum. Roger’s research focuses on transatlantic affairs and the post-Soviet Sphere, where his work has been featured in the Center for International Maritime Security, Review of European & Transatlantic Affairs, and Atlantic Voices. To date he has visited half of the former Soviet Republics including the breakaway region of Transnistria as well the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant.

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Rolf Holmboe

  • 2016 -Fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute
  • 2015 - Independent advisor on temporary leave from the Danish Foreign Service, resident in Ottawa, Canada
  • 2013 - 2015Ambassador of Denmark to Lebanon, Syria and Jordan (residence in Beirut)
  • 2012 - 2013Ambassador of Denmark to Syria and Jordan
  • 2010 - 2012 Director of Strategy and Policy Planning, MFA (ia Arctic Strategy, Middle East, EU Presidency)
  • 2009 - 2010 Head of Stabilisation Department, MFA
  • 2005 - 2009 Danish Representative to the Palestinian Authority, Head of the Danish Representative Office Ramallah, Danish Representative to UNRWA
  • 2004 - 2005 Deputy Head of Neighbourhood Department, MFA (programmes in the Former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe)
  • 2003 - 2005 External Lecturer at the Institute of Political Science, University of Copenhagen (conflict studies, fragile states)
  • 2001 - 2004 Head of Horn of Africa, EU and Transversal Issues Section in the Africa Department, MFA
  • 1997 - 2001 Head of West Africa (Sahel) Section, Africa Department, MFA
  • 1995 - 1997 First Secretary at Denmark’s Delegation to NATO, Bruxelles
  • 1992 - 1995 Head of Section and Deputy European Correspondent in the Security Policy and in the Eastern Europe Departments of the MFA1
  • 1992 Master of Political Science, University of Aarhus1990Supplementary Degree in Arabic Studies, University of Aarhus
  • 1987 - 1988 Military peacekeeping service with UNFICYP (based in Cyprus)
  • 1982 - 1985 Two separate years of security/administrative service at the Danish Embassy, Moscow

Military Career

  • 1982-Officer of the Danish Army Reserve, current rank Major.
  • 2011-2016 Commander of the Foreign Area Capabilities Corps

Has previously served inter alia in UN missions and as a Conventional Forces in Europe Treaty (CFE) Arms Control Inspector

Other Posts

  • 2015- Expert Adviser, Centre for Empathy in International Affairs (CEIA) (www.centerforempathy.org)
  • 2011-Member of the Advisory Board, Center for War Studies, Southern Denmark University

Selected Articles

  • "Syria – Who Blocks Peace” in The Dispatch, Canadian Global Affairs Institute, Volume XIV, Spring 2016: https://d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.net/cdfai/pages/
    97/attachments/original/1458067006/
    Dispatch_-_Spring_2016.pdf?1458067006
  • “Syria – Avoiding a Dangerous Disconnect”, website for the Center for Empathy in International Affairs (CEIA), February 2016: http://www.centerforempathy.org/
    syria-avoiding-the-dangerous-disconnect/
  • “Analyse – har Syrien en fremtid?” in Udvikling, No. 6, December 2015, ISBN 978-87-90656-836-9: http://ipaper.ipapercms.dk/Udenrigsministeriet/Udvikling/
    2015/Udviklingnr62015/
  • “ISIS som magtfaktor i Syrien, Irak og regionen”, in Et farvel til terror? Krigen mod ISIS 2014 – 2015, Carsten Jensen og David Vestenskov, red., Forsvarsakademiet, 2015, ISBN: 978-87-7147-108-3: http://www.fak.dk/publikationer/Documents/
    Et%20farvel%20til%20terror.pdf
  • “Gaza – challenges and adaptation”, in Humanitarian Exchange, September 2009, ISSN 1472-4847: http://odihpn.org/wp-content/uploads/
    2009/10/humanitarianexchange044.pdf
  • “Krig, krise og håb” in Udenrigs,, No. 1, 2009, ISSN 1395-3818: http://udenrigs.dk/
    wp-content/uploads/2014/02/1-2009.pdf
  • “Conflict and Conflict Responses in Africa”, in em>Conflict, Human Security, Governance and Development in the Developing World,, Bjørn Møller ed., Development Research Series, Occasional Papers No. 6, Aalborg University, 2005, ISBN: 87-90874-06-4/ISBN1399-3999: http://www.academia.edu/1647762
    /Conflicts_and_Conflict_Responses_in_Africa

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Andrew House

Andrew House is a Principal with the Earnscliffe Strategy Group where he advises on the impacts of national and cyber security requirements in federally-regulated industries and transactions.

Andrew began his career in 2003 as an advisor on arms control and justice reform to the United Nations Mission to Kosovo, after which he returned to Canada as criminal defence and civil litigation counsel. For nearly a decade, Andrew served as a senior advisor to federal ministers of Justice, Immigration, and Heritage. Most recently, he served as Chief of Staff to successive ministers of Public Safety & Emergency Preparedness, tackling issues as diverse as borders & trade, victims’ rights, policing policy, and security & intelligence reform.

A lawyer by training, Andrew has extensive experience in policy development, regulatory affairs, and litigation management. With a focus on national security as it intersects with business, Andrew advises clients seeking a better understanding of the expectations of government for corporations in the protection of critical infrastructure and safety of citizens.

Andrew holds a Bachelor of Arts (International Relations) from Dalhousie University (`99) and a Bachelor of Laws from the Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie University (`01). He is a member of the bars of Ontario (2003) and Nova Scotia (2004) and a member of the Foreign Investment Review Committee of the Canadian Bar Association. He has appeared in national print and broadcast media as a commentator on justice, borders, and national security.

Born in Gander, NL, Andrew has also called Halifax, and now Ottawa home.

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Rob Huebert

Rob Huebert is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Calgary. He also severed as the associate director of the Centre for Military and Strategic Studies. He was appointed as a member to the Canadian Polar Commission (now renamed Canada Polar Knowledge) for a term lasting from 2010 to 2015. He is also a research fellow with the Canadian Global Affairs Institute and sits on the board of the Van Horne Institute. Dr. Huebert has taught at Memorial University, Dalhousie University, and the University of Manitoba. His area of research interests include: international relations, strategic studies, the Law of the Sea, maritime affairs, Canadian foreign and defence  policy, and circumpolar relations. He publishes on the issue of Canadian Arctic Security, Maritime Security, and Canadian Defence. His work has appeared in International Journal; Canadian Foreign Policy; Isuma- Canadian Journal of Policy Research and Canadian Military Journal. He was co-editor of Commercial Satellite Imagery and United Nations Peacekeeping and Breaking Ice: Canadian Integrated Ocean Management in the Canadian North. His most book written with Whitney Lackenbauer and Franklyn Griffiths is Canada and the Changing Arctic: Sovereignty, Security, and Stewardship. He also comments on Canadian security and Arctic issues in both the Canadian and international media. 

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Peter Jones

Peter Jones is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Ottawa. He holds a Ph.D. in War Studies from Kings' College, London, and an MA in War Studies from the Royal Military College of Canada. Before joining the University of Ottawa, he served as a senior analyst for the Security and Intelligence Secretariat of the Privy Council of Canada. Previously, he held various positions related to international affairs and security at the Department of Foreign Affairs, the Privy Council Office, and the Department of Defence. A widely published expert on security in the Middle East and track-two diplomacy, he led the Middle East Security and Arms Control Project at the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) in Sweden in the 1990s. He is presently leading several Track Two initiatives in South Asia and the Middle East, and is also widely published on Iran. Peter is currently an Annenberg Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and a Fellow with the Canadian Global Affairs Institute.

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Thomas Juneau

Thomas Juneau is an assistant professor at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. at the University of Ottawa His research focuses mostly on the Middle East, in particular on Iran, Yemen, and Syria. He is also interested in Canadian foreign and defence policy and in the nexus between analysis and policy. He is the author of Squandered Opportunity: Neoclassical realism and Iranian foreign policy (Stanford University Press, 2015), co-editor of Iranian Foreign Policy since 2001: Alone in the world (Routledge, 2013), and co-editor of a forthcoming book on case studies of analytical support to policy-making (Rowman&Littlefield). He has also published many articles and book chapters on the Middle East, international relations theories and pedagogical methods, notably in International Affairs, International Journal, International Studies Perspectives, Middle East Policy and Orbis. Prior to joining the University of Ottawa, he worked for the Department of National Defence from 2003 to 2014, chiefly as a strategic analyst covering the Middle East. He was also a policy officer and an assistant to the deputy minister.

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Amy Karam

Amy Karam is a global expansion and competitive strategy consultant, speaker and the author of THE CHINA FACTOR: Leveraging Emerging Business Strategies to Compete, Grow and Win in the New Global Economy. She is also a corporate instructor for Stanford and Duke University, as well as her own workshops and is a trusted authority on globalization, innovation, competitive strategy and the shifting power dynamics in international business, given the rising strength of China and other emerging nations.

Amy equips companies and governments with insights and strategies to successfully navigate these new international trade dynamics and guides start-up businesses to Fortune 500 corporations in creating focused, innovative, global expansion strategies.

With over 15 years in Silicon Valley, and her extensive international business experience, Amy has worked with leading companies such as Apple, Cisco, Visa, Nationwide, CapitalOne, Bell and has negotiated strategic deals with over 50 countries in emerging and developed markets.

The intersection of globalization, politics and the way we innovate is intertwined like never before. Practicing these principles, Amy has fostered public-private sector collaboration initiatives with the World Bank, ITU-D (International Telecommunications Union – Development Sector), Ministers of emerging countries, and the high-tech industry. She also created an initiative to escalate unfair global trade practices to the US Dept. of Commerce in Washington DC on behalf of high-tech firms.

Amy has been published in magazines such as Forbes, Entrepreneur, The Hill Times and China’s Business Tianjin; has been interviewed by Yahoo Finance, Google, CTV News; and has spoken at companies and conferences worldwide.

Her TEDx Talk highlights her perspectives on global trade and competitiveness, the need to adapt to the power shift and maintain an Innovation Advantage.

She has an International MBA and a Bachelor of Administration, having studied at the University of Ottawa and at McGill University. She also completed the Innovation for Economic Development Program at the Harvard Kennedy School.

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Tom Keenan

Dr. Thomas P. Keenan is a Professor in the Faculty of Environmental Design, Adjunct Professor of Computer Science and Research Fellow at the Centre for Military and Strategic Studies at the University of Calgary.  His research focuses on computer security and the social implications of technology.  With a background as a Systems Analyst and Systems Programmer for large mainframe computers, he taught Canada’s first computer security course in 1976.  He co-wrote and hosted the 1984 CBC IDEAS radio series “Crimes of the Future” and is the author of a forthcoming book on creepiness in technology.  He holds a Bachelor’s degree in Philosophy, a Master of Science (Engineering) degree in Mathematical Methods and Operations Research and a Master of Arts and a Doctorate in Education, all from Columbia University.  He participated in the 1983 Department of Justice consultation that led to Canada’s first computer crime law, and has served as an expert witness in several court cases.  

A frequent contributor to the media and public discourse about technology, he was awarded the 2012 NSERC Award for Science Promotion.  He holds numerous professional designations including Information Systems Professional of Canada (I.S.P.), and Information Technology Certified Professional (ITCP) and is a Fellow of the Canadian Information Processing Society.  He received the Queen’s Jubilee Commemorative Medal in 2003 and the Order of the University of Calgary in 2007.  He currently serves on the boards of the SEEDS Foundation and the Information and Communications Technology Council of Canada, and has served as a Director of the Society for the Policing of Cyberspace and the Calgary Police Museum Interpretive Centre. 

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Brian Kingston

Brian Kingston is the Vice-President of Policy, International and Fiscal Issues at the Business Council of Canada. He leads the Council’s work on international trade, investment, fiscal and monetary policy issues. In this role he manages CEO engagement with India, Japan, Brazil and China, the Council’s tax policy advisory network and the annual Total Tax Contribution report. Prior to joining the Council, Brian gained comprehensive experience across the federal government through various positions at the Department of Finance, Global Affairs Canada, the Treasury Board Secretariat and the Privy Council Office. Brian is an Action Canada Fellow, World Economic Forum Global Shaper and alumnus of the 2015 Governor General’s Canadian Leadership Conference. He holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from Carleton University, a master’s degree in international affairs from the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs and an MBA from Ivey Business School. 

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Adam Lajeunesse

Adam Lajeunesse, PhD is an Assistant Professor at St. Francis Xavier University, where he holds the Irving Shipbuilding Chair in Arctic Marine Security. He is also a research associate at the Centre for Military, Strategic, and Security Studies and the Arctic Institute of North America – both at the University of Calgary, and a fellow with the Centre on Foreign Policy and Federalism at the University of Waterloo. He is a regular lecturer at the NATO Defence College (Rome) and the Canadian Forces College (Toronto) as well as a frequent speaker on northern security issues for academic, government, and military audiences.

Dr. Lajeunesse is the author of Lock, Stock and Icebergs – a history of Canada’s Arctic maritime sovereignty focused on the interplay between American security concerns and Canadian sovereignty requirements. He has also co-authored books on China’s Arctic interests and the evolution of northern military operations, as well as numerous articles and publications on northern defence, development, shipping, governance, and maritime policy.

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Eugene Lang

Eugene Lang is Adjunct Professor, School of Policy Studies, Queen’s University, where he teaches in both the full-time MPA and part-time Professional MPA programs.

His career has included twelve years in the federal government in a variety of roles, including Senior Policy Advisor (Economic) to the Deputy Prime Minister of Canada; Senior Economist, Finance Canada and Chief of Staff to two Ministers of National Defence.  He was heavily involved in the development of the 2005 Defence Policy Statement and government decisions with respect to Canada’s involvement in Afghanistan and Ballistic Missile Defence.  Lang was instrumental in the largest funding increase to the Department of National Defence in a generation. 

A former Visiting Fellow at the Munk School of International Studies, University of Toronto, Lang was also BMO Visiting Fellow, Glendon School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA), Glendon College, York University, where he taught three courses in the Masters of Public and International Affairs program.  In 2014 he served as Interim Co-Director of the GSPIA.

Lang is the co-author of two books, including The Unexpected War: Canada in Kandahar (co-authored with Janice Stein), a national best seller which won the Writer’s Trust Shaughnessy Cohen Award for political writing, was short-listed for the Donner Prize for the best book on Canadian public policy, was named one of the Globe and Mail’s top one hundred books of the year, and was the basis for a documentary film produced by Global Television.

A frequent contributor to various newspapers, including the Toronto Star, Ottawa Citizen and Globe and Mail, Lang’s writings have also appeared in Walrus, Policy Options, Policy Network, and International Politics and Society.  He has spoken at numerous universities and think tanks in Canada and abroad, and has appeared numerous times as a commentator on CBC radio and television, CTV and Global Television.

Educated at the University of Western Ontario (B.A., M.A., political science), Queen’s University (M.P.A.), and the London School of Economic (M.Sc., International Political Economy), where he studied as a Chevening Scholar, Lang lives in Ottawa with his wife and two children.

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Gavin Liddy

Gavin Liddy recently retired from the Federal Government after 36 years of service.   

Most recently he was the Associate Deputy Minister of Public Services and Procurement Canada where he supported several Ministers delivering procurement, real estate and receiver general services to the Government of Canada. Prior to this appointment, Gavin spent five years at the Treasury Board Secretariat of Canada as an Assistant Secretary.  As a member of the Secretariat, he supported the Treasury Board by providing advice and recommendations on government operations, economic programs, defence, international affairs, security and justice.  Over this eight year period he was involved in all aspects of the current National Defence procurement program including the National Shipbuilding Program and procurement of the next fighter.   

Prior to joining the Treasury Board Secretariat he was a member of the Parks Canada Team for six years.  During his time with Parks he was Superintendent of the Rideau Canal and worked in the National Office as a member of the Executive Board with responsibility for Finance, Real Property and Information Management. 

A graduate of Royal Military College in Kingston and the University of Ottawa, he also spent over twenty years in the Canadian Forces serving in various operational and headquarters positions.

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Matthew Lombardi

Matthew Lombardi currently works in strategy & governance and public policy for the Future of Canada Centre, Deloitte’s thought leadership unit, which performs original research and publishes reports, articles, and papers that provide insights for businesses, governments, and academia. He is a contributing writer to the firm's U.S. Consulting Innovation internal market signals publication, which assists global Deloitte team members make sense of the rapidly changing world of work. His professional background includes half a decade in consulting, providing trusted advice to clients in public policy and strategy.

Matthew’s research interests include global technology policy issues, and the impact of emerging technologies on sovereignty, diplomacy, trade, and foreign affairs.

In his spare time, he serves as a Corporate Member of Angel Investors Ontario, an organization that provides capital and mentorship to innovative start-ups province-wide, which has enabled just over $300 million dollars to be invested into 500 high-potential early-stage ventures. He also serves on the Board of Directors of Toronto North Support Services, which performs street outreach to homeless individuals, and provides community support for individuals with a major mental illness. He holds an MSc with Distinction in International Relations from the London School of Economics, where he focused on Sino-Canadian relations.

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Dennis McConaghy

Dennis McConaghy has 30 years of experience in the Canadian energy industry in prominent commercial executive positions that included the commercial development of the Keystone XL pipeline systems within TransCanada Pipelines from its conception in 2006 to the finalization of commercial agreements in 2008.  He is currently a visiting fellow at the public policy and energy studies schools at the Ivey Business School at the University of Western Ontario and an adjunct fellow at the Niskanen Center, a DC based think tank focused on carbon and energy policy. Recently Dennis published a book, “Dysfunction - Canada after Keystone XL”, analyzing the Keystone XL experience and its implications for Canada. As well, he continues to be an active commentator on current energy and carbon policy issues.

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Randolph Mank

Randolph Mank is a global business executive and a three-time former Canadian ambassador, with over thirty years of experience in both the public and private sectors around the world.

In business, he has worked as President Asia for Swiss company, SICPA, and as Vice President Asia for BlackBerry.

In government, overseas, he has been Canadian Ambassador to Indonesia, Pakistan and Malaysia. He also served in Greece, Sweden, Indonesia again, and Japan.

In Ottawa, Mank was Director-General for Asia at Canada's Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade between 2006-08. In the same role, he served as Canada's Senior Official for ASEAN and, for six months, oversaw the Afghanistan Task Force.

Earlier, he headed the G7 Foreign Minister's Secretariat for Canada from 1999-2003, while serving as Director for Policy Planning in Ottawa. In that role, he quarterbacked a Canadian foreign policy review and co-chaired a CSR Taskforce.

Born in Kitchener, Ontario, Mank studied at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo and The London School of Economics. He speaks Indonesian and Japanese, in addition to English and French. Among honours, he was Canadian Public Service Mentor of the Year in 1999, and a Laurier Top 100 Alumni of Achievement in 2011.

Currently, he serves as a Fellow of both the Canadian Global Affairs Institute and the Balsillie School of International Affairs, while offering consulting services as President of MankGlobal Inc.

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Barbara Martin

With over 30 years of experience in Canada’s department of foreign affairs, Barbara Martin is now an Adjunct Professor in the School of Policy Studies at Queen’s University where she teaches Canadian foreign policy. 

Over the course of her career, Ms. Martin worked on a diverse range of international policy areas including security, peacekeeping, development, economic relations, human rights and Canada’s relations with the U.S. She also has extensive experience with respect to Canada’s multilateral engagement in the UN, ASEAN, G8 / G7, G20, NATO and NORAD. In 2013, she co-chaired the G20 Anti-Corruption Working Group during Russia’s G20 Presidency.

She was Director General for the Middle East and North Africa during the tumultuous period of the Arab Spring. And, having worked on Canada’s engagement in Afghanistan in the early years immediately following 9/11, she was later Director General of the Afghanistan Task Force during the lead up to Canada’s withdrawal from Kandahar. She has also worked in various capacities in the Privy Council Office, including in the Foreign and Defence Policy Secretariat, and the Security and Intelligence Secretariat.

Abroad, Ms. Martin has served in Canada’s embassy in Manila, Philippines (during the People Power Revolution), as well as in Canada’s Delegation to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in Paris, France where, among other responsibilities, she addressed energy, environment and development issues.

She is a graduate of Queen’s University, with an MPA from the School of Policy Studies, as well as a BA Hons and a BEd. She spent one year of her undergraduate degree at St. Andrew’s University, Scotland. In addition, she has served as an elected Councillor in the Municipality of Chelsea, Quebec where she lives. As a volunteer, she has been President of Outlook Camping, Inc. (a wilderness camp for at-risk youth), as well as a Board Member of Canadian Crossroads International.

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Kyle Matthews

Kyle Matthews is the Executive Director of the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies (MIGS) at Concordia University. He joined MIGS as Lead Researcher of the Will to Intervene Project in 2008 and was appointed Senior Deputy Director in 2011. At Concordia he founded the Raoul Wallenberg Legacy of Leadership project as well as the Digital Mass Atrocity Prevention Lab, which works to counter online extremism and study how social media platforms are being used as a weapon of war.

His work focuses on human rights, international security, the Responsibility to Protect, global threats, and social media and technology, and global cities. He works closely with the Canadian All-Party Parliamentary Group for the Prevention of Genocide and has advised Members of Parliament on issues related to international peace and security. He previously worked for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, where he was posted to the Southern Caucasus (Tbilisi), the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Kinshasa) and Switzerland (Geneva). Prior to that he worked for CARE Canada in Albania and later at its headquarters in Ottawa, where he managed various humanitarian response initiatives and peace-building projects in Afghanistan, Sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East.

In 2011 he joined the New Leaders program at the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. He is a member of the Global Diplomacy Lab, a member of the BMW Foundation’s Global Responsible Leaders network, and recently joined the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s advisory board on transatlantic cooperation for atrocity prevention. He is active member of the University Club of Montreal, the Montreal Press Club, the Montreal Council on Foreign Relations, the Canadian International Council and the Federal Idea, a think tank devoted to federalism. He is currently a Research Fellow at the Canadian Research Institute on Humanitarian Crises and Aid.

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Eric Miller

Eric Miller is a Fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute. He focuses on issues related to North America, trade, technology and security.

Mr. Miller also is President of Rideau Potomac Strategy Group, a cross-border consultancy that advises clients on government affairs, economics, cybersecurity and geopolitical developments.

He previously served as Vice President of Policy, North America and Cybersecurity at the Business Council of Canada, which represents the CEOs of the 150 largest companies in Canada. He also was responsible for leading its work in the United States and Latin America and on border/supply chain issues, transportation policy, and anti-corruption rules. He led the Council’s policy work on cybersecurity, technology and telecom issues.

Before joining the Council in 2013, Mr. Miller represented Industry Canada at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, DC. He was responsible for advising senior Canadian officials on U.S. economic, political, and technology issues. He served as a member of the Canadian negotiating teams that designed Canada’s 2009 investments in the restructuring of the Chrysler and General Motors and the 2011 Canada-U.S. Beyond the Border Action Plan.

Mr. Miller has extensive international experience, having advised 40 governments in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Asia-Pacific on trade and economic policies. He worked for 8 years in the Integration and Trade Division of the Inter-American Development Bank and served as a USAID Chief of Party in Panama.

Mr. Miller has testified before the U.S. Congress and the Canadian Parliament.

He is presently Chair of the Cybersecurity Advisory Board of Ridge Canada Cyber Solutions Inc., a leading provider of cyber insurance solutions and cyber advisory services. He also serves on a number of advisory boards, including the Canadian Cyber Threat Exchange.

Separately, Mr. Miller is a Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center’s Canada Institute and a Non-Resident Fellow at the Stimson Center’s Trade in the 21st Century project.

He holds a Master’s Degree in International Affairs from Carleton University, a Graduate Diploma from the Bologna Center of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, and a Bachelor’s Degree (Honors) from Saint Mary’s University. He is fluent in Spanish and French.

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Robert Muggah

Dr. Robert Muggah is the Research Director of the Igarapé Institute, a Research Director of the SecDev Foundation, and teaches at the Instituto de Relações Internacionais, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro. He is also a fellow at the University of Oxford and the Graduate Institute's Center for Conflict, Development and Peacebuilding in Switzerland. He is the co-founder and executive editor of Stability Journal. Dr. Muggah also works with UN agencies, the World Bank, and Google Ideas on issues related to fragility, conflict and violence and ways new technology can help. Dr. Muggah received his DPhil at Oxford University and his MPhil at the Institute for Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex. He received his BA from the University of Kings College and Dalhousie University.

From Brazil Robert directs several projects on international cooperation, peace-support operations, transnational organized crime, and cyber-security in Latin America and the Caribbean. He currently oversees the Humanitarian Action in Situations Other than War (HASOW) project, the States of Fragility project and the Urban Resilience project. He routinely advises governments, international organizations and civil society groups on security and development issues. For example, in 2012 and 2013 he was an adviser to the High Level Panel on the post-2015 development agenda and the Global Commission on Drug Policy. In 2013, he was named one of the top 100 most influential people in the world on armed violence reduction by a UK-based organization.

Previously, Dr, Muggah was research director at the Small Arms Survey (2000-2011), a lecturer at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies and an advisor to a number of multilateral and bilateral organizations on issues of arms control, security sector reform, migration, and stabilization and reconstruction. He has led research and evaluations in over 30 countries across Latin America and the Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa and the Middle East, South Asia and the South Pacific on related themes. His recent policy outputs includes chapters for forthcoming flagship reports of the Inter-American Development Bank, UNDP, World Bank and others like the Urban Dilemma (2012) for IDRC and DFID, advisory support to the World Bank's World Development Report (2011), the UNDP's Governance for Peace report (2012), and others by the OECD-DAC.

Dr. Muggah's work is published in dozens of academic and policy journals. Most recently, he is the editor of Stability Operations, Security and Development (New York: Routledge, 2013) and co-editor of the Global Burden of Armed Violence (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011). He is also the author of Security and Post-Conflict Reconstruction: Dealing with Fighters in the Aftermath of War (New York: Routledge, 2009), Relocation Failures in Sri Lanka: A Short History of Internal Displacement (London: Zed Books, 2008), and No Refuge: The Crisis of Refugee Militarization in Africa (London: Zed Books 2006) and has contributed more than 14 chapters to the Small Arms Survey since 2001.

Dr. Muggah has published over one hundred articles in peer-review journals including International Peacekeeping, Security Dialogue, Contemporary Security Policy, The Commonwealth Journal of International Affairs, Conflict, Security and Development, The Journal of Refugee Studies, The Journal of Disasters, Forced Migration Review, and many others. In addition to featuring in international media and writing opeds for the NYT, LAT, Guardian, Huffington Post, Atlantic and others, Dr. Muggah has also been involved in co-writing and advising documentary films on violence, drug policy and development. Most recently, he has been designing new interactive online visualization tools of the global arms trade, as well as android applications to enhance police accountability from Rio de Janeiro to Nairobi and Cape Town.  

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Michael Nesbitt

Michael Nesbitt teaches and researches in the areas of national security law and economic sanctions, criminal law, and international organizations and human rights. Before joining the Faculty of Law at the University of Calgary in July 2015 he practiced law and worked on Middle East policy, human rights, international sanctions and terrorism for Canada's Department of Foreign Affairs. Previously, he completed his articles and worked for Canada's Department of Justice, where his focus was criminal law. Michael has also worked internationally for the United Nations' International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia in the Appeals Chamber.

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Kevin O’Shea

Kevin O’Shea who recently retired from the Canadian public service after nearly 35 years of service focuses his current advisory work and research on borders, Canada-US relations and public diplomacy.  His public service career included assignments as an Assistant Secretary, Beyond the Border Implementation Team, in the Privy Council Office, and assignments in the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade in Ottawa, the Canadian Embassy in Washington, the Canadian Consulate in New York, the Canadian Mission to the EU in Brussels, the Canadian Mission to the OECD in Paris and the Canadian High Commission in Ghana. He sits on the International Advisory Board of Borders in Globalization, a multi-country research consortium on borders, and has recently become a Canadian Global Affairs Institute Fellow. 

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David Perry, Vice President & Senior Analyst

Dr. David Perry is the Vice President, Senior Analyst and a Fellow with the Canadian Global Affairs Institute. He is the author of multiple publications related to defence budgeting, transformation and procurement, published with the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, Conference of Defence Associations Institute, Defence Studies, Comparative Strategy, International Journal, and Journal of Military and Strategic Studies and is a columnist for the Canadian Naval Review. He received his PhD in political science from Carleton University where his dissertation examined the link between defence budgeting and defence procurement. He is an adjunct professor at the Centre for Military and Strategic Studies at the University of Calgary and a research fellow of the Centre for the Study of Security and Development at Dalhousie University.  He was previously the Senior Security and Defence Analyst of the Conference of Defence Associations Institute and Deputy Director of Dalhousie University’s Centre for Foreign Policy Studies.  Embassy Magazine and The Hill Times named him one of the "Top 100 Influencing Canadian Foreign Policy” in 2014.

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Vanja Petricevic

Vanja Petricevic is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Florida Gulf Coast University, USA. She holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Georgia State University and her research interests encompass fields of European Politics, International Relations and Comparative Politics. Her primary interests are in political integration and compliance in the European Union, processes of democratization and EU accession, and right-wing extremism and violence in Western and Central/Eastern Europe.

She is the author of the book Compliance Patterns with EU Anti-Discrimination Legislation (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015) and has been the recipient of the Fulbright-Schuman Fellowship, the Belgian American Educational Foundation Fellowship, the Government of Belgium (Flemish Community) Fellowship, the National Scholarship of the Slovak Republic, and the Swedish Women's Educational Association Award. She held Visiting Researcher positions at several institutions and think tanks across Europe, including the Center for European Policy Studies in Brussels, the European Parliament (Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs), and the Slovak Academy of Sciences in Bratislava. Her postdoctoral research was conducted at Linköping University in Sweden.

Prior to joining Florida Gulf Coast University, she taught at Georgia State University and the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta.

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George Petrolekas

Colonel George Petrolekas served for years as an army officer (regular and reserve) and as a senior executive in the telecommunications industry.

As an army officer, he was in mechanized units in various command roles and also served at FMC HQ and on the Divisional staff. He transferred to the reserves rising to command of a Regiment. Col. Petrolekas served in Bosnia in 93-94 and participated in establishing part of the Sarajevo Total Exclusion Zone, the implementation of the Washington peace accord and the transfer of authority in Srebrenica. He also served with NATO and in Afghanistan. In the latter conflict, he became recognized as a pre-eminent authority on NATO and Coalition warfare serving as a confidant and trusted agent between the Canadian CDS and senior NATO and U.S. officials.

Col. Petrolekas helped prepare every ISAF and U.S. commander and command groups for Afghan service in the years 2003-2007. He received commendations from several ISAF Commanders including Gen. Rick Hillier, Gen. Sir David Richards, Lt-Gen Mauro Delvecchio, and the DCOM JFC Brunssum, amongst others. 

 He established many of the protocols used to this day for the evacuation of Canadian wounded through Europe and received the Meritorious Service Medal for his work. He served as a strategic advisor to the Chief of Defence Staff for which he received a CDS commendation for the management of the Afghan detainee file.

Col. Petrolekas’ writing has appeared in: The Globe and Mail, The National Post, The National Interest, The International Herald Tribune, The Los Angeles Times, and The Montreal Gazette. He has been a commentator on many television networks in Canada, the U.S. and Europe in both English and French. 

He has briefed U.K. Parliamentarians, U.S. Divisional staffs, the Pakistani War College, the Chinese Institute for International Strategic Studies and the French War College (IHEDN), the latter inviting him for a month long tour of the Pacific to audit their regional session on strategic issues.

He is a co-author of various research papers including the annual The Strategic Outlook for Canada, the Implementation of NATO’s Strategic Concept – a DFAIT policy paper, and has acted as an advisor to officers of Parliament such as the Parliamentary Budget Officer.

In business, Col. Petrolekas worked as director of marketing for ABL Canada and Memotec Teleglobe and has led sales and marketing efforts in some 90 countries notably building telecoms networks in Venezuela, the United Kingdom, Brazil and Mexico amongst others. 

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Joël Plouffe

Joël Plouffe is a researcher at CIRRICQ (Center for Interuniversity Research on the International Relations of Canada and Québec) at the École nationale d’administration publique (ENAP) in Montréal, managing editor of the ArcticYearbook (www.arcticyearbook.com), and is a U.S. State Department International Visiting Program Alumnus (IVLP Arctic Security). His research interests include security and defense, geopolitics of the Arctic, regions of the circumpolar North, Northern Québec, and U.S.-Canada relations and foreign policy.

Mr Plouffe is involved in various northern research groups and programs. He is a member of the Northern Research Forum’s Thematic Network on Geopolitics and Security (www.nrf.is), led by Dr Lassi Heininen from the University of Lapland (Finland); is actively involved in the annual Calotte Academy that takes place in the Barents Euro-Arctic Region; and is a project member of ArcticNet’s group on Climate Change and Commercial Shipping in the Arctic, led by Dr Frédéric Lasserre of Université Laval in Québec City (Canada). In August 2012, Joël Plouffe was embedded with Canada’s National Defense and Canadian Forces in the Western Arctic (Northwest Territories) during the annual ‘Operation Nanook’. 

Mr Plouffe has conducted research in the Arctic regions of Russia, the US (Alaska), Norway (Svalbard and mainland), Finland, Sweden and Canada (Nunavik, Northwest Territories). He has also delivered addresses and lectures in many international venues and was an invited Arctic expert at the National Assembly of France and the German Bundestag in 2010. That same year, he pursued oil and gas research in Norway’s High North with international experts from the Bodø Graduate School of Business and also addressed key ministers at the European Parliament on non-Arctic state interests and policies for the Arctic region. He has also collaborated with the Canada Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington DC on issue of Arctic geopolitics.  

In 2013, Mr Plouffe serverd as Visiting Professor at the Jackson School for International Studies (JSIS) at the University of Washington in Seattle, where he was co-teaching a Task Force on Arctic Security. He was also Visiting Scholar at NYU’s Center for Global Affairs (CGA) in Spring 2013, as part of the Polar Politics program led by Dr Carolyn Kissane at the School of Continuing Professional Studies (NYU-SCPS). He was also Visiting Scholar at Western Washington University in 2010 where he was invited to teach Québec Politics and Contemporary Issues while pursuing research at the Canadian-American Studies Center.  

Joël Plouffe was born in the mining town of Sudbury in Northern Ontario, Canada, and is now living in Montréal, Québec where he is working on his PhD thesis at UQAM, looking at how the Arctic has influenced US foreign policy making from the Nixon presidency to President Barack Obama’s first mandate.  

Keywords: Arctic Geopolitics and Security, Circumpolar Affairs, Barents/EU Arctic, Canada-US Relations and Foreign Policies, Globalization in the Arctic, Northern Québec/Nunavik.

Twitter : @joelplouffe
Linkedin : http://www.linkedin.com/in/joelplouffe
Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/Arcticyearbook

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Andrew P. Rasiulis

Mr. Rasiulis completed his undergraduate study in Political Science/History at the University of Toronto in 1978 and received his Master of Arts from the Norman Patterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University, in Strategic Studies in 1979. In 1979 Mr. Rasiulis was appointed a commissioned officer in the Canadian Forces Primary Reserve (Governor General's Foot Guards).  

He joined the Department of National Defence in 1979 as an analyst with the Directorate of Strategic Analysis, specializing in strategic politico-military issues pertaining to conventional forces. These issues included emerging concepts of conventional defence strategies for Western Europe, as well as the Canadian Government's efforts in the area of conventional arms control. In 1987, Mr. Rasiulis was promoted to Section Head, within the Directorate of Nuclear and Arms Control Policy, responsible for conventional arms control policy. He was also the Department of National Defence representative on NATO's High Level Task Force for conventional arms control from its inception in 1986 to 1989.  

In June 1989 Mr. Rasiulis was posted as a Defence Advisor to the Canadian Delegation for Conventional Arms Control Talks in Vienna. Upon completion of his tour Mr. Rasiulis returned to National Defence Headquarters in April 1992 as Section Head responsible for policy on Central and Eastern Europe, including the Department's Military Training and Assistance Program (MTAP) with Central and Eastern Europe. In May 1996, Mr. Rasiulis was also assigned the responsibility of Programme Manager for the entire MTAP. He was subsequently designated as Director, Military Training Assistance Programme (and Eastern European Policy) in 1998.  

Reflecting the growth of responsibility within the area of defence diplomacy, Mr. Rasiulis was re-designated Director Military Training and Cooperation in 2009. His responsibilities included the development of the policy for defence training cooperation with developing countries world wide, as well as overseeing its operational implementation.  

Mr. Rasiulis' MA thesis, On the Utility of War in the Nuclear Age, developed a theory on limited conventional war. It was subsequently published as a Wellesley Paper in 1981 by the Canadian Institute for International Affairs and the Canadian Institute for Strategic Studies. He has also published numerous articles on conventional strategy, arms control and international military training cooperation. 

Mr Rasiulis is retired from the Public Service and is now a freelance consultant with Andrew Rasiulis Associates Inc.  

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Tom Ring

Tom Ring has nearly 40 years of federal government experience.  Most recently, he served as Assistant Deputy Minister (Acquisitions) at Public Works and Government Services Canada, and Assistant Deputy Minister (Public Affairs) at the Department of National Defence. While at PWGSC, he was responsible for all defence acquisitions and was the government’s lead negotiator on many complex procurement files.  He is one of the architects of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy, the Defence Procurement Strategy and the Smart Procurement initiative.  He also managed the CF-18 replacement program and the Maritime Helicopter Project.  While at DND, he was responsible for all strategic and crisis communications for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Forces, including the war in Afghanistan, the Defence Policy Statement and various defence procurement files.  Prior to joining National Defence, he worked in senior management, operational and advisory roles in several federal departments, including the Canadian Coast Guard, the Department of Canadian Heritage, Human Resources Development Canada and the Privy Council Office. He holds an M.A. (War Studies) from the Royal Military College of Canada, and is a Senior Fellow at the University of Ottawa’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, where he teaches a Graduate level course in communications.

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Colin Robertson, Vice President

A former Canadian diplomat, Colin Robertson is Vice President and Fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute and hosts its regular Global Exchange podcast. He is an Executive Fellow at the University of Calgary’s School of Public Policy and a Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton University. Robertson sits on the advisory councils of the Johnson-Shoyama School of Public Policy, Conference of Defence Associations Institute, North American Research Partnership, the Sir Winston Churchill Society of Ottawa. He is an Honorary Captain (Royal Canadian Navy) assigned to the Strategic Communications Directorate. He is a member of the Deputy Minister of International Trade’s NAFTA Advisory Council and the North American Forum. He writes on foreign affairs for the Globe and Mail and he is a frequent contributor to other media.

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Lindsay L. Rodman

Lindsay L. Rodman is the Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow (Canada), placed at the University of Ottawa's Centre for International Policy Studies (CIPS).  She is a U.S. attorney and an expert in U.S. defence and foreign policy, and recently joined CFR (a U.S.-based think tank) and CIPS after leaving the Obama Administration, where she served in the Pentagon as Senior Advisor for International Humanitarian Policy.  Prior to her political appointment, she was an active duty judge advocate in the U.S. Marine Corps, serving in various roles, including as Deputy Legal Counsel to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and as the Operational Law Attorney for 1st Marine Division (FWD) in Afghanistan.  Her last duty assignment as an active duty Marine was in the White House as Director for Defense Policy and Strategy at the National Security Council.  She remains in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves.  Prior to joining the Marine Corps, Lindsay was an associate at the law firm of Arnold& Porter LLP (now Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer) in Washington, DC.  She is a graduate of Harvard Law School (JD, 2007), the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University (MPP, 2007), and Duke University (AB Mathematics, 2003).

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Stephen Saideman

Stephen Saideman holds the Paterson Chair in International Affairs at Carleton University’s Norman Paterson School of International Affairs.  His research interests are in the fields of international security, comparative foreign policy, civil-military relations, and ethnic conflict.   

Before joining Carleton University, Prof. Saideman was Canada Research Chair in International Security and Ethnic Conflict at McGill University.  Prior to that, Prof. Saideman spent 2001-2002 on the U.S. Joint Staff working in the Strategic Planning and Policy Directorate as part of a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellowship.  He has also taught at Texas Tech University and the University of Vermont.  He has won two awards for teaching. 

He has written The Ties That Divide: Ethnic Politics, Foreign Policy and International Conflict; For Kin or Country: Xenophobia, Nationalism and War (with R. William Ayres); NATO in Afghanistan: Fighting Together, Fighting Alone (with David Auerswald); and Adapting in the Dust: Learning Lessons from Canada's War in Afghanistan.  He has written on nationalism, ethnic conflict, civil war, and civil-military relations in leading academic journals, including International Organization and International Studies Quarterly.   

Professor Saideman writes online at OpenCanada.org, Political Violence at a Glance, Duck of Minerva and his own site (saideman.blogspot.com).  He also tweets too much at @smsaideman.  He has also appeared in more traditional media (newspapers, television and radio) in Canada and the U.S.

He holds a Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego, which is where he also earned his M.A.  He received his B.A. from Oberlin College.

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Hugh Segal

Hugh Segal is currently Master of Massey College at the University of Toronto and a Senior Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs. Hugh is a former chair of both the Foreign Affairs and Anti-Terrorism Committees of the Canadian Senate‎, where he served from 2005-2014. A former chief of staff to the Prime Minister (1991-1993), he is Chair of the Atlantic (Nato) Council of Canada and the Navy League of Canada. He is the former President of the Institute for Research on Public Policy (1999-2006) and was Canada's Special Envoy to the Commonwealth. He sits on the editorial board of the Canadian Naval Review and holds a history degree from the University of Ottawa, as well as honorary doctorates from his alma mater and The Royal Military College of Canada. He has authored five books on conservative public policy and history, and edited a book on geopolitical integrity and security strategy for the IRPP. In 2003 he was appointed to the Order of Canada. 

Keywords: National security, foreign policy

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Elinor Sloan

Elinor Sloan is Professor of International Relations in the Department of Political Science at Carleton University, Ottawa, and is a former defence analyst with Canada’s Department of National Defence. She is a graduate of the Royal Military College of Canada (BA), the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton (MA), and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University (PhD).

Dr. Sloan's research interests include: the defence policies and military capabilities of Canada, the United States, major NATO allies, Australia and China; homeland security and defence, NORAD, space and ballistic missile defence, and the Arctic; and, contemporary strategic thought.

Her books include The Revolution in Military Affairs (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2002); Security and Defence in the Terrorist Era (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2005 & 2010); Military Transformation and Modern Warfare (Praeger Publishers, 2008); and Modern Military Strategy (Routledge, 2012).

Keywords: Canadian defence policy, Canadian Forces, US defence policy, homeland defence, ballistic missile defence, defence transformation, NATO, NORAD

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Sarah E.K. Smith

Sarah E.K. Smith is an Assistant Professor of Communication and Media Studies at Carleton University. She is affiliated faculty in the Bachelor of Global and International Studies program (BGInS) at Carleton University, and in the Cultural Studies Program at Queen’s University. Her research is broadly focused on contemporary art and institutions, with specific interest in the relationship between culture, economics, and globalization.

Dr. Smith’s current work addresses cultural diplomacy. She is a founding member of the North American Cultural Diplomacy Initiative (NACDI), a multi-disciplinary partnership of academics, policymakers and practitioners interested in interrogating and advancing cultural diplomacy as a tool to foster international and transcultural relations. In 2015, Smith was the Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California. She has also held a Postdoctoral Fellowship with the Transnational Studies Initiative at Harvard University’s Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and a Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Department of English and Film Studies at the University of Alberta.

Contact:
Website: saraheksmith.com
Twitter: @sarah_ek_smith

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Gary Soroka 

Born in Montréal, Gary Soroka was educated in Canada and the University of Edinburgh where he received his PhD in Political Philosophy. He joined the Department of External Affairs in 1976, and served at Headquarters in the Political and Strategic Analysis Division, the Cabinet Liaison Division, the Policy Planning Secretariat, the Personnel Bureau and the Consular Policy Division.

He became Director of Political and Security Policy in the Policy Planning Bureau in September 1993, and senior policy advisor in 1995.

Dr. Soroka has served abroad in Canadian Embassies and Consulates in Washington, New Delhi, London, San José Costa Rica and Berlin. In 1986-87, he was the Canadian Exchange Officer in the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs in Canberra, Australia.     

Dr. Soroka spent most of his career within the Department as a specialist in the area of foreign policy: he worked on four major foreign policy reviews during his career as well as on many specific policy issues. In 1990, he was brought back from India on special duty to develop the central concepts for a major review of Canadian security policy. In 1993, he was brought back from London on special duty to work on a task force looking at the role of, and appropriate structures for, a forward-looking, relevant and adaptable foreign ministry. In 1993, he was awarded the first ever Minister’s Award for Foreign Policy Excellence.

Dr. Soroka was one of the Department’s lead foreign policy speechwriters, and he has written many speeches for Canadian Prime Ministers, Foreign Ministers, Ambassadors and senior officials on diverse foreign policy subjects.

Dr. Soroka is married to Sabine Sparwasser, a member of the German Foreign Service, and they have two children. He currently divides his time between Berlin and Toronto.

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Hugh Stephens

Mr. Stephens has more than 35 years of government and business experience in the Asia-Pacific region. Based in Victoria, BC, Canada, he is currently Executive-in-Residence at the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada and Vice Chair of the Canadian Committee for Pacific Economic Cooperation (CanCPEC). After serving for a number of years as Senior Vice President, Public Policy (Asia Pacific), for Time Warner, where he was based at the company’s Asia regional headquarters in Hong Kong, Mr. Stephens until recently continued to serve Time Warner in an advisory capacity as Senior Advisor on Public Policy for Asia Pacific and Canada. Mr. Stephens has extensive experience in dealing with media and IT industry issues (protection of intellectual property, improved market access, regulatory issues) in China, India, SE Asia, Korea/Japan and elsewhere in Asia.

Mr. Stephens has been an active leader in a number of regional business organizations. Until recently he served on the Executive Committee of the Board of the US National Center for APEC and is a past Executive Committee Board member of the US-Korea Business Council. He was a member of the Board of Directors of the US-ASEAN Business Council for a number of years.  He is also a past Governor of the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong and Vice Chair of the Quality Brands Protection Committee, a coalition of more than 180 multinational companies engaged in strengthening IPR protection in China. He served two terms as a Governor of the Cable and Satellite Broadcasting Association of Asia.

In February 2012, Mr. Stephens was appointed to a new position as Executive-in-Residence at the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada, in Vancouver. Executives in Residence are industry leaders with experience and knowledge on Asia who provide thought leadership through research, events and activities with the Foundation. He is also a Fellow of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute and Vice President of the Victoria Branch of the Canadian International Council.

Prior to entering the corporate world with Time Warner in 2000, Mr. Stephens served for almost 30 years in the Canadian Foreign Service, reaching the position of Assistant Deputy Minister for Policy and Communications in the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) in Ottawa. He also served abroad as Canadian Representative in Taiwan (Director-General of the Canadian Trade Office in Taipei), Counsellor and Charge d’affaires at the Canadian Embassies in Seoul, Korea and Islamabad, Pakistan, among a number other overseas and headquarters assignments, including service at the Canadian Embassy in Beijing and Mandarin language training in Hong Kong.

Mr. Stephens was educated at UBC (BA-Hons), University of Toronto (B.Ed) and Duke University (MA), and has a Certificate in Mandarin from the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

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Al Stephenson

Alan Stephenson is an aviation consultant and a 35-year veteran of the Canadian Forces. Colonel (ret’d) Stephenson’s extensive knowledge of NORAD and NATO airpower follows from his experience as a CF-18 pilot with 3600 hours flying fighters and as a staff officer at all levels of command. Having held senior appointments such as Special Assistant to the Vice Chief of the Defence Staff, Special Assistant to the Deputy Chief of the Defence Staff, Chief of Tactical Evaluation, and Director of Western Hemisphere Policy, he has a broad understanding of military and interagency operational and strategic interaction, both domestically and internationally. Operationally, he commanded Task Force Aviano during Op ECHO (1999/00) and 410 Tactical Fighter (Operational Training) Squadron, Canada’s basic and advanced ‘top gun’ training schools.

Alan is a graduate of Royal Roads Military College with a BSc in Physics (Sword of Honour recipient), the Canadian Forces Command and Staff College (with Distinction), and the United States Air Force Air War College where he received a Master of Strategic Studies with a focus on the strategic employment of airpower. His Master’s thesis, “Shades of Gray: Gradual Escalation and Coercive Diplomacy” won the Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff Strategy Essay Competition in 2002, the only international student so honoured to date. Alan completed his PhD at Carleton University in May 2016 writing his thesis on Canadian National Security Culture. His areas of interest include international relations, strategic studies, airpower, Canadian defence and foreign policies, NORAD, NATO, and Canada-US relations.

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Kelly Sundberg

Dr. Kelly Sundberg is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics, Justice, and Policy Studies at Mount Royal University, an Adjunct Professor in the School of Law at the University of Adelaide, Associate Professor in the Faculty of Environmental Design at the University of Calgary, and Fellow of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the University of Victoria, Master of Arts in Justice and Public Safety Leadership and Training from Royal Roads University, and a Doctor of Philosophy in Political and Social Inquiry with a specialization in Criminology from Monash University.

Between 2011 and 2013, Dr. Sundberg served as the Chair of the Mount Royal University Department of Justice Studies, and between 2010 and 2012 as the alternate non-government organization representative to the United Nations for the Academy of Criminal Justice Science. Prior to commencing his academic career, Dr. Sundberg worked over fourteen years for the Government of Canada in various border security, policy development, and advisory roles –– during which time he received commendations for assisting in the location of three abducted children and apprehending one of the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation’s most wanted fugitives. As a noted criminologist, Dr. Sundberg has been qualified as an expert on matters relating to crime prevention and crime reduction through design by the Alberta Court of Queen’s Bench, and on matters relating to immigration enforcement by the Provincial Court of Alberta (Criminal Division).

He has presented his scholarship at high-profile international conferences as a keynote speaker, showcased his research at academic symposiums around the world, and is also published in a variety of academic and industry periodicals. Most recently, and in collaboration with Dr. Tanya Trussler, Dr. Douglas Olson, and Ralph Snell, AIA (with earlier contributions from Dr. Nikki Filipuzzi), Dr. Sundberg led the development of the SAFE Design Standard® –– an innovative and multidisciplinary crime reduction through design methodology focused on reducing both the risk and fear of crime through informed planning, design, and engineering.

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Denis Thompson

Major-General (Retired) Denis Thompson served 39 years in the Canadian Army as an Infantry Officer.  He deployed on multiple operations commanding at the platoon, company, battalion, brigade, national, and multinational level in Canada and abroad in Cyprus, Germany, Bosnia, Afghanistan and Egypt including command of NATO’s Task Force Kandahar (2008/09), Canada’s Special Operations Forces (2011-2014) and the Multinational Force & Observers in the Sinai (2014-2017).

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James Trottier

James Trottier is a lawyer and former diplomat who graduated with a law degree (JD) from Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto and was called to the bar in Toronto.  He worked in a major civil litigation law firm in Toronto before joining the Department of External Affairs. In addition to his JD in law,  he has an LL.M. in International Law (University of Ottawa), a M.A. in Modern History (University of Toronto) and a B.A (University of Manitoba).   

Mr. Trottier served as a career Foreign Service Officer from 1982 to 2016 with numerous assignments at headquarters and abroad where he served in several senior diplomatic positions. Since retiring from Global Affairs Canada in 2016, he has served as a consultant to the Government of Canada as well as providing media commentary.      

His last diplomatic assignment from 2013 to 2016 was as Political/Economic Counsellor and Head of Political, Economic and Public Affairs at the Canadian Embassy in the Republic of Korea with a cross-accreditation to North Korea where he led four diplomatic delegations in 2015 and 2016 (the first Canadian diplomatic missions to North Korea since 2010).  He also served as Canadian Embassy Liaison to US Forces Korea/UN Command, co-hosted with the  US Embassy the annual North Korea Watchers Conference attended by  diplomatic, military and intelligence experts and led the Canadian Delegation. Mr. Trottier played a leading role in securing the timely South Korean ratification of the Canada-Korea Free Trade Agreement and in organizing the exchange of official visits by the Prime Minister of Canada and the President of South Korea; he was the lead negotiator of the Joint Statement/Joint Declaration for each visit.   

From 2007 to 2011, Mr. Trottier  served as Political/Economic Counsellor at the Canadian Embassy in Manila, Philippines where he was involved in efforts to advance the peace process in Mindanao, human rights and media freedom.

He also served in two assignments in the Canadian Embassy in Bangkok, Thailand, including from 1998 to 2003 as Political/Economic Counsellor while serving concurrently as the Chargé d'affaires to Burma where he met regularly with Ministers and  senior government officials as well as with then-Opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and other Opposition figures.   

From 1990 to 1994, Mr. Trottier served at the Permanent Mission of Canada to the United Nations in New York where he was responsible for global human rights as well as serving as acting Legal Adviser to the Canadian Chair of the Iraq Sanctions Committee of the UN Security Council. He was a lead negotiator for Canada of the 1993 Vienna Declaration on Human Rights.

He held various headquarters positions at Global Affairs Canada dealing with multilateral issues as well as bilateral relations with Asia, Europe and the United States. From 2003 to 2007 he served as the Senior Political Adviser for political relations with the European Union and Senior Coordinator for the annual Canada-EU Summit; in that capacity he planned, organized and participated in four Canada-EU Summits as well as numerous other high level meetings and was a lead negotiator for the Summit declarations. From 1994 to 1996, he worked on environmental relations with the US.   

From 1985 to 1987, Mr. Trottier served as Legal Adviser and External Affairs Liaison Officer to the Refugee Status Advisory Committee (RSAC), the government committee then responsible for determining refugee claims from within Canada. 

trottierjames@hotmail.com

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Heidi Tworek

Dr. Heidi Tworek is Assistant Professor of International History at the University of British Columbia, where she is also a member of the Science and Technology Studies program, the Language Science Initiative, and the Institute for European Studies. She is a visiting fellow at the Joint Center for History and Economics at Harvard University as well as a non-resident fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States.

Heidi’s work focuses on media, international organizations, and transatlantic relations. She has published over a dozen academic articles in venues including Journal of Global History and Journal of Policy History. Her current book project examines how Germans tried to control world communications in the first half of the twentieth century. She is also co-editor of two volumes that will appear in 2018, one on international organizations and the media, the other on the makers of global business. She manages the United Nations History Project website, the leading scholarly website on the history of international organizations. Her further research interests include contemporary media and communications, German and transatlantic politics, the digital economy, the history of technology, legal history, the history of health, and higher education. Her writing has been published in English and German in venues including Foreign Affairs, The Atlantic, Politico, War on the Rocks, Wired, Nieman Journalism Lab, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Der Tagesspiegel, ZEIT, Internationale Politik, and The Conversation. Heidi has also appeared on the BBC, CBC, and NPR.

Heidi received her BA (Hons) in Modern and Medieval Languages with a double first from Cambridge University and earned her MA and PhD in History from Harvard University. Her dissertation received the Herman E. Krooss Prize for best dissertation in business history. 

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Stéfanie von Hlatky

Stéfanie von Hlatky is an associate professor of political studies at Queen’s University and the Director of the Queen’s Centre for International and Defence Policy (CIDP).  She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from Université de Montréal in 2010, where she was also Executive Director for the Centre for International Peace and Security Studies. In 2010, she was a postdoctoral fellow at Georgetown University’s Center for Peace and Security Studies and a policy scholar with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C. In 2011, she was a Visiting Professor at Dartmouth College’s Dickey Center for International Understanding. Prior to joining Queen’s, von Hlatky was a senior researcher with the Center for Security Studies at ETH Zurich. She has published in the Canadian Journal of Political Science, International Journal, European Security, Asian Security, as well as the Journal of Transatlantic Studies and has a book with Oxford University Press entitled American Allies in Times of War: The Great Asymmetry (2013). Her new book, The Future of US Extended Deterrence (co-edited with Andreas Wenger) analyzes US security commitments to NATO (Georgetown University Press, 2015). Stéfanie von Hlatky is the founder of Women in International Security-Canada and current Chair of the Board. Her research is funded by NATO, the Canadian Department of National Defence, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Government of Ontario’s Ministry of Research and Innovation and Fulbright Canada.

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Charity Weeden

Charity Weeden is President and co-founder of Lquinox Consulting LLC, an independent space and data management consulting company fostering international partnerships and providing expert advice on the economic, security, scientific, and societal benefits of satellite applications. Recently, Ms. Weeden was Senior Director of Policy at the Satellite Industry Association, responsible for advancing industry interests in government services, regulatory, legislative, defense, export-control and trade. As a 23-year veteran of the Royal Canadian Air Force, Weeden served as operator, manager, and diplomat for air and space applications in various posts. Her last assignment was as Assistant Attaché of Air & Space Operations at the Embassy of Canada in Washington, DC, liaising with the U.S. Government and Embassy space community. Weeden has also held positions at the Canadian Space Agency, NORAD and USNORTHCOM Headquarters, and U.S. Air Force Space Command, where she was responsible for providing analysis of U.S. Space Surveillance Network satellite observations. She started her Air Force career as a long-range maritime patrol Air Navigator on the CP-140 Aurora, conducting sovereignty operations in the North, fishery and pollution patrols, search and rescue operations, and submarine tracking.

Weeden is a graduate of the Royal Military College of Canada (BEng) and the University of North Dakota (MSc). She has also participated in certificate programs at both the Brookings Institute (Policy Strategy) and the International Space University.

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John Weekes

John Weekes, an expert in international trade policy and trade agreements, joined Bennett Jones in 2010.

From 1971 until 1999 John worked in the Canadian government on the development of trade policy, participating in negotiations and working to ensure their successful implementation. During these years he assisted ministers in successive governments advising on the formulation of the government's approach to managing trade relations and on the negotiation of trade agreements.

He represented Canada in trade negotiations and at various international trade meetings. He was Canada’s ambassador to the WTO from 1995 to 1999. From 1991 to 1994 he served as Canada’s chief negotiator for NAFTA. He was ambassador to GATT during the Uruguay Round of multilateral trade negotiations. In the 1970s, he participated in the Tokyo Round of GATT negotiations.

As NAFTA chief negotiator, John played a key role in managing the negotiating process inside the Canadian government including in determining the best way to structure Canada's negotiating effort and the composition and organization of the negotiating team. After the implementation of NAFTA and the creation of the WTO he played a lead role in advising on how to restructure the trade policy functions inside Canada's Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade to take account of the changed landscape of trade agreements.  

In 1999 he left the Canadian government but remained in Geneva to join APCO Worldwide (a Washington-based international public affairs consultancy). In 2003 he joined the American law firm Sidley Austin. He returned from Geneva to Canada in 2009.

He is an active participant in the work of the London based Legatum Institute's Special Trade Commission dealing with Brexit related issues, the Canadian Agri-Food Policy Institute, the Advisory Centre on WTO Law in Geneva, and the Washington-based Cordell Hull Institute. He is also a member of the Canadian National Committee on Pacific Economic Cooperation and a fellow of the Canadian Global affairs Institute.

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PODCAST

The Royal Canadian Navy in the Indo-Pacific: A Discussion with Matthew Fisher

June 18, 2018



On today's Global Exchange Podcast, we turn our eyes to the Indo-Pacific, as we assess Canada's naval presence in the region, and the recent deployment of MV Asterix to take part in various multilateral exercises with Canada's Pacific allies. Join our host, Dave Perry, in conversation with CGAI Fellow Matthew Fisher, as they discuss Canada's naval presence around the Indo-Pacific, Chinese military build-up throughout the East and South China Seas, the successes of MV Asterix's recent deployment in the Pacific, and a future for the Canadian Navy in an increasingly militarized Pacific environment.


IN THE MEDIA

Singapore and a Safer World

by David Kilgour (feat. James Trottier), The Epoch Times, June 18, 2018

Malfunctioning sensor another ‘snag’ for prime minister’s aging plane

by Mercedes Stephenson (feat. Dave Perry), CTV News, June 17, 2018


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