In The Media

Federal shipbuilding program suffers delays

by Lee Berthiaume (feat. David Perry)

The Star
December 9, 2016

OTTAWA—The federal shipbuilding program has hit another setback, as government documents show more delays in the construction of the navy’s new supply ships and the Canadian Coast Guard’s highly anticipated polar icebreaker.

The delays, revealed in departmental reports recently tabled in the House of Commons, are expected to cost taxpayers as the navy and coast guard are forced to rely even more heavily on stop-gap measures to address their needs.

The two supply ships, which together will cost $2.6 billion, and the $1.3-billion polar icebreaker, dubbed the John G. Diefenbaker, are to be constructed one after the other in Vancouver by shipbuilding company Seaspan.

All three vessels are desperately needed as technical problems recently forced the navy’s two existing supply ships into early retirement, while the coast guard’s 50-year-old Louis St-Laurent heavy icebreaker was supposed to retire next year.

National Defence and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans reported last year that the first new supply ship would enter the water in 2020, while the Diefenbaker would arrive in 2021 or 2022.

But the departments’ most recent timetable says construction of the first supply ship won’t be finished until at least 2021, with completion of the Diefenbaker similarly delayed until 2022 or 2023.

When the federal government’s $35-billion national shipbuilding plan, which includes construction of new Arctic patrol vessels and a fleet of warships in Halifax, was first announced in 2010, it was expected the supply ships and icebreaker would all be finished by 2018.

National Defence spokesman Evan Koronewski blamed “challenges associated with completing the detailed design and organizing the entire supply chain” for the delay in the supply ship schedule.

Those challenges were also responsible for pushing back construction of the Diefenbaker, as work on the icebreaker can’t start until the supply ships are finished.

The federal government has already committed millions of dollars in recent years to extend the lives of the current icebreaker fleet.

But the new delays help explain why the coast guard started looking last month at whether it can lease between one and five icebreakers from the private sector for the foreseeable future.

They also mean that the navy will be forced to rely more on allies as well as a converted civilian cargo ship to provide fuel, food and other supplies to Canadian naval ships at sea.

There have been questions over the years about Seaspan’s ability to construct complex military vessels, given that its previous shipbuilding experience has largely revolved around ferries and tugboats.

The company referred questions to the government.

But defence analyst David Perry of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute suggested bad planning is to blame, as government officials were overly optimistic — or wholly unrealistic — about the shipbuilding plan’s various timelines.

“The whole enterprise is very behind schedule,” he said.


Be the first to comment

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
 
SEARCH
PODCAST

Brian Mulroney as a Master of Persuasion: A Discussion with Fen Hampson

August 20, 2018

On today's Global Exchange Podcast, we sit down with the Chancellor’s Professor at Carleton University, and CIGI Fellow, Fen Osler Hampson, to discuss his recently released book entitled "Master of Persuasion: Brian Mulroney's Global Legacy".



EXPERTS IN THE MEDIA

Northern defence upgrades part of plan to protect Canada’s Arctic, Sajjan says

by Alex Brockman (feat. Rob Huebert), CBC News, August 20, 2018

Les Forces canadiennes dans un Arctique en plein changement

by Mario De Ciccio (feat. Rob Huebert), Radio-Canada, August 20, 2018

China and Russia strengthening relationship in bid to thwart US dominance

by Matthew Carney (feat. Stephen Nagy), ABC, August 19, 2018

Multiculturalism is here to stay.. but what about Maxime Bernier?

by Anna Desmarais (feat. Andrew Griffith), iPolitics, August 17, 2018

What happens when building pipelines becomes Fortnite?

by Chris Varcoe (feat. Dennis McConaghy & Kevin Birn), Calgary Herald, August 17, 2018

Gracing Canada on NAFTA: Experts weigh in, one year later

by Nicole Gibillini (feat. Colin Robertson), BNN Bloomberg, August 16, 2018


LATEST TWEETS

HEAD OFFICE
Canadian Global Affairs Institute
Suite 1800, 421-7th Avenue SW
Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2P 4K9

 

OTTAWA OFFICE
Canadian Global Affairs Institute
8 York Street, 2nd Floor
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N 5S6

 

Phone: (613) 288-2529
Email: contact@cgai.ca
Web: cgai.ca

 

Making sense of our complex world.
Déchiffrer la complexité de notre monde.

 

© 2002-2018 Canadian Global Affairs Institute
Charitable Registration No. 87982 7913 RR0001

 


Sign in with Facebook | Sign in with Twitter | Sign in with Email