X
HELP US MAKE SENSE OF OUR COMPLEX WORLD
The Canadian Global Affairs Institute provides credible, open access expertise on global affairs. With your support, we can continue to spark impassioned nation-wide discussions designed to help Canadians better understand their role in the international arena.
S U P P O R T   U S
SUPPORT US

In The Media

Liberals' new pro-Canada procurement caveat still being figured out

by Catherine Tunney (feat. Dave Perry)

CBC News
December 16, 2017

The Liberal government has a new rule book for judging procurement competitions — it's just not sure how it will read yet.

While launching its long-awaited fighter jet competition on Tuesday, the Liberal government also revealed its intention to evaluate all future defence purchases in part through the lens of whether individual companies have helped or hurt the overall Canadian economy.

That was a clear nod to the government's public spat with Boeing, maker of the Super Hornet. Boeing has been in the government's bad books since it launched a trade complaint against Bombardier to impose punishing tariffs on the Montreal-based aerospace giant's C Series aircraft.

Carla Qualtrough, minister of public services and procurement, said the government is still hammering out what the criteria for the new requirement will be and how heavily it will be weighed when deciding who ultimately will make Canada's next fleet of fighter jets.

"We're going to work over the next year to really flesh that out with industry, with suppliers, with experts," she told host Chris Hall on CBC Radio's The House.

"We haven't come down to the technical details."

Already, analysts have flagged potential political trade, legal and even military consequences.

Dave Perry, an analyst with the Canadian Global Affairs Institute who follows the procurement file, said lawyers could have a field day with that.

"When you get down to the nuts and bolts, the government is going to draw up with a 'naughty and nice' list for whether company A or B is helping or hurting the Canadian economy," he said.

'Elements of subjectivity'

Perry said unless the government comes up with some "mathematical formula based on market evidence," the policy would inject a "degree of subjectivity" into contracts that companies can contest either in court or before international trade tribunals.

"Oh, this has elements of subjectivity for sure, and we can't avoid that," said Qualtrough.

The self-described "minister of process" said the government will likely write the criteria between finalizing the supplier list and formalizing the request for proposals.

And Qualtrough said the government has consulted its lawyers.

"We of course wouldn't be announcing a policy direction if we didn't think it was legally prudent to take this direction," she said.


Be the first to comment

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
 
SEARCH
EXPERTS IN THE MEDIA

Is UN Peacekeeping Losing its Appeal?

by Jay Heisler (feat. Tim Dunne), Voice of America, July 22, 2021

Privatizing Forests; Right-Wing Extremism; Vaccine Passports; Crypto Sustainability

by Ryan Jespersen (feat. Aden Dur-e-Aden), Real Talk Ryan Jespersen, July 21, 2021

Why the Canadian Forces need big iron

by David Reevely (feat. David Perry and Ron Lloyd), The Logic, July 21, 2021

U.S. not rushing to ease travel restrictions at Canadian border

by James McCarten (feat. Laurie Trautman), National Observer, July 21, 2021

The Road to 100% zero-emission vehicles by 2035

by Larysa Harapyn (feat. Brian Kingston), Financial Post, July 20, 2021

Canada to Reopen Border with US to Fully Vaccinated Travelers

by Craig McCulloch (feat. Laurie Trautman), Voice of America, July 20, 2021

Country-of-origin labelling discussion re-emerges in U.S.

by Jennifer Blair (feat. Fawn Jackson), Canadian Cattlemen, July 20, 2021

Invited but Not Let In: Canada Places Thousands of Lives on Hold

by Reedah Hayder (feat. Andrew Griffith), Toronto Star, July 15, 2021


LATEST TWEETS

HEAD OFFICE
Canadian Global Affairs Institute
Suite 1800, 150–9th Avenue SW
Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2P 3H9

 

OTTAWA OFFICE
Canadian Global Affairs Institute
8 York Street, 2nd Floor
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N 5S6

 

Phone: (613) 288-2529
Email: [email protected]
Web: cgai.ca

 

Making sense of our complex world.
Déchiffrer la complexité de notre monde.

 

© 2002-2021 Canadian Global Affairs Institute
Charitable Registration No. 87982 7913 RR0001

 


Sign in with Facebook | Sign in with Twitter | Sign in with Email